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Assessing the role of economic instruments in a policy mix for biodiversity conservation and ecosystem services provision : a review of some methodological challenges

by Barton, David N; Ring, Irene (autor/a); Rusch, Graciela M (autor/a); May, Peter (autor/a); DeClerck, Fabrice A. J (autor/a); Vignola, Raffaele (autor/a); Vivan, Jorge Luis (autor/a); Ansink, Erik (autor/a); Unnerstall, Herwig (autor/a); Santos, Rui (autor/a); Ibrahim, Muhammad (autor/a); ... [y otros 6].
Type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Policy Mix. Discussion Paper ; 1-2010.Publisher: [Lugar de publicación no identificado] : POLICYMIX , 2010Description: 29 páginas : 5 ilustraciones, 1 tabla ; +.Other Title: La evaluación de la función de los instrumentos económicos en una combinación de políticas para la prestación de servicios de conservación de la biodiversidad y de los ecosistemas: una revisión de algunos problemas metodológicos.Subject(s): CONSERVACION DE LA DIVERSIDAD BIOLOGICA | ECOSISTEMA | INCENTIVOS | POLITICAS | ECONOMETRIA | INSTRUMENTOS DE MEDICION | ANALISIS DE COSTOS Y BENEFICIOS | METODOLOGIA | EVALUACION | ACTIVIDADES ECONOMICAS | BRASIL | COSTA RICA | SERVICIOS ECOSISTEMICOSOnline Resources: Texto completo (En) | http://hdl.handle.net/11554/8242 Summary: In this paper we review a number of methodological challenges of evaluating and designing economic instruments aimed at biodiversity conservation and ecosystem services provision in an existing policy mix. In the context of the EU 2010 goal of halting biodiversity loss, researchers have been called upon to evaluate the role of economic instruments for cost-effective decision-making, as well as non-market methods to assess their benefits. We argue that cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) and non-market valuation (NMV) methods are necessary, but not sufficient, approaches to assessing the role of economic instruments in a policy mix. We review the principles of “social-ecological systems” (SES) [1] and discuss how SES can complement economic cost and benefit assessment methods, in particular in policy design research. To illustrate our conceptual comparison of assessment methodologies, we look at two examples of economic instruments at different government levels – payments for ecosystem services (PES) at 14 farm level and ecological fiscal transfers to municipal /county government. Which policy design issues can cost-effectiveness analysis and non-market valuation methods address for these two instruments? What conceptual problems are introduced when evaluating policies in an instrument mix? How can the SES framework complement CEA and NMV in policy assessment and design? We draw on experiences from Brazil and Costa Rica to exemplify these questions. We conclude with some research propositions.
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In this paper we review a number of methodological challenges of evaluating and designing economic instruments aimed at biodiversity conservation and ecosystem services provision in an existing policy mix. In the context of the EU 2010 goal of halting biodiversity loss, researchers have been called upon to evaluate the role of economic instruments for cost-effective decision-making, as well as non-market methods to assess
their benefits. We argue that cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) and non-market valuation (NMV) methods are necessary, but not sufficient, approaches to assessing the role of economic instruments in a policy mix. We review the principles of “social-ecological systems” (SES) [1] and discuss how SES can complement economic cost and benefit assessment methods, in particular in policy design research. To illustrate our conceptual comparison of assessment methodologies, we look at two examples of economic instruments at different government levels – payments for ecosystem services (PES) at
14 farm level and ecological fiscal transfers to municipal /county government. Which policy design issues can cost-effectiveness analysis and non-market valuation methods address for these two instruments? What conceptual problems are introduced when evaluating policies in an instrument mix? How can the SES framework complement CEA and NMV in policy assessment and design? We draw on experiences from Brazil and Costa Rica to exemplify these questions. We conclude with some research propositions.

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