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An analysis of the factors that facilitate persistence of family farmers in agriculture on the Costa Rican frontier

by Shaver, Irene; CATIE, Turrialba (Costa Rica). Escuela de Posgrado.
Type: materialTypeLabelArticleDescription: 59 páginas : 1 ilustraciones, 2 tablas ; 21.59 x 27.94 cm.Subject(s): EXPLOTACION AGRICOLA FAMILIAR | AGRICULTURA TRADICIONAL | AGRICULTURA COMERCIAL | MERCADOS | MODERNIZACION | INNOVACION | PARTICIPACION DE AGRICULTORES | SECTOR AGROINDUSTRIAL | DESARROLLO RURAL | SARAPIQUI | COSTA RICA | MEDIOS DE VIDA | CAPITALES DE LA COMUNIDADOnline Resources: Texto completo (En) | http://hdl.handle.net/11554/7669 Summary: Producing and selling food in modern, global markets is fiercely competitive and presents several challenges to family farmers. When family farmers are participating in this modern agrifood system, how they are participating or what alternatives they have found are critical to understanding contemporary agrarian livelihoods. These questions also inform the social and ecological implications of the partial process of capitalist incorporation of agriculture. This article focuses on the modernization of agricultural markets in the Sarapiquí region, located in Northern Costa Rica and demonstrates how farmers’ decisions to participate or not in these modern markets is related to structural and ecological factors and navigation of both individual and collective capital within particular agricultural sectors. We demonstrate our findings through descriptive, quantitative and qualitative analysis of surveyed farmers, and from interview data with producer organizations, agricultural policy makers and government representatives. We describe the market structure and collective organizations operating in three different agricultural product sectors (i.e. pineapple, pepper, cattle and dairy) that span modern and traditional markets. Real farmer and rancher profiles are compared to demonstrate the range of how family farmers construct their livelihoods in relation to these agricultural product sectors, collective capital and the crop or product’s characteristics. We find that, although agricultural production and markets have become more oriented towards export crops like pineapple for international trade, family farmers in the frontier region of Northern Costa Rica mostly are participating in domestic markets for traditional crops orproducts. They make this decision based on reasoning that weighs the tradeoffs in cost, risk and market accessibility, with their individual capabilities and the characteristics of the crop or product and finally in relation to support from the state and producer organizations.
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Tesis (Ph. D.) -- CATIE, Escuela de Posgrado, Turrialba (Costa Rica), 2014

Bibliografía páginas 139-148

Producing and selling food in modern, global markets is fiercely competitive and presents several challenges to family farmers. When family farmers are participating in this modern agrifood system, how they are participating or what alternatives they have found are critical to understanding contemporary agrarian livelihoods. These questions also inform the social and
ecological implications of the partial process of capitalist incorporation of agriculture. This article focuses on the modernization of agricultural markets in the Sarapiquí region, located in Northern Costa Rica and demonstrates how farmers’ decisions to participate or not in these modern markets is related to structural and ecological factors and navigation of both individual and collective capital within particular agricultural sectors. We demonstrate our findings through descriptive, quantitative and qualitative analysis of surveyed farmers, and
from interview data with producer organizations, agricultural policy makers and government representatives. We describe the market structure and collective organizations operating in
three different agricultural product sectors (i.e. pineapple, pepper, cattle and dairy) that span modern and traditional markets. Real farmer and rancher profiles are compared to
demonstrate the range of how family farmers construct their livelihoods in relation to these agricultural product sectors, collective capital and the crop or product’s characteristics. We
find that, although agricultural production and markets have become more oriented towards export crops like pineapple for international trade, family farmers in the frontier region of
Northern Costa Rica mostly are participating in domestic markets for traditional crops orproducts. They make this decision based on reasoning that weighs the tradeoffs in cost, risk and market accessibility, with their individual capabilities and the characteristics of the crop or product and finally in relation to support from the state and producer organizations.

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