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Understanding plant community assembly mechanisms in highly diverse neotropical forests through the assessment of functional beta diversity

by Chain Guadarrama, Adina; Finegan, Bryan (autor/a); Vierling, Lee A (autor/a); Sesnie, Steven E (autor/a); CATIE, Turrialba (Costa Rica). Escuela de Posgrado.
Type: materialTypeLabelArticleDescription: 35 páginas : 8 ilustraciones, 5 tablas ; 21.59 x 27.94 cm.Subject(s): ECOLOGIA FORESTAL | BOSQUE TROPICAL | ARBOLES | ESPECIES | TAXONOMIA | COMPOSICION BOTANICA | DINAMICA DE POBLACIONES | POBLACION VEGETAL | CARACTERISTICAS DEL RODAL | BIODIVERSIDAD | FACTORES AMBIENTALES | USO MULTIPLE DEL BOSQUE | RECURSOS FORESTALES | COMUNIDADES RURALES | DESARROLLO DE LA COMUNIDAD | COSTA RICA | GRADIENTES ALTITUDINALES | RASGOS FUNCIONALESOnline Resources: Texto completo (Es) | http://hdl.handle.net/11554/8122 Summary: The mechanisms controlling tree species assembly in Neotropical forests are still debated. A taxonomic approach has traditionally been used to assess vegetation response to environmental and spatial predictors, but the information held in species functional traits should further elucidate the factors determining community turnover in these diverse forests. To test hypotheses related to environmental deterministic and dispersal assembly of Neotropical forest communities, we assessed patterns of taxonomic and functional turnover, or beta diversity, across broad geographic and environmental gradients. Using abundance and functional trait data for dominant trees and palms distributed in 127 forest plots across a northern Costa Rican landscape, we quantified the influence of environmental and spatial predictors on taxonomic and functional composition variation (variation partitioning) and assessed patterns of taxonomic and functional turnover with increasing geographic and environmental distances (Mantel correlation tests and Mantel correlograms). Environmental predictors explained greater proportion of taxonomic and functional composition variation than spatial predictors. Functional and taxonomic turnover increased with increasing geographic and environmental differences between plots, but once controlling for environmental change spatial patterns in taxonomic and functional composition were no longer observed. However, spatial structure in residual taxonomic and functional turnover was observed when examining individual distance lags. This, together with the pure effect of spatial predictors, suggests that community turnover is also explained by geographic proximity between plots alone. Our results indicated the existence of a scale-dependent interaction between deterministic and stochastic community assembly, showing that community turnover results from species recruitment along regional spatially structured environmental gradients, and from species limited dispersal at local scales. As such the 10 assessment of functional turnover hold great potential for estimating community assembly mechanisms in this biome.
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Tesis (Ph. D.) -- CATIE. Escuela de Posgrado. Turrialba (Costa Rica), University of Idaho, 2014.

Bibliografía páginas 26-30

The mechanisms controlling tree species assembly in Neotropical forests are still debated. A
taxonomic approach has traditionally been used to assess vegetation response to
environmental and spatial predictors, but the information held in species functional traits
should further elucidate the factors determining community turnover in these diverse forests.
To test hypotheses related to environmental deterministic and dispersal assembly of
Neotropical forest communities, we assessed patterns of taxonomic and functional turnover,
or beta diversity, across broad geographic and environmental gradients. Using abundance and
functional trait data for dominant trees and palms distributed in 127 forest plots across a
northern Costa Rican landscape, we quantified the influence of environmental and spatial
predictors on taxonomic and functional composition variation (variation partitioning) and
assessed patterns of taxonomic and functional turnover with increasing geographic and
environmental distances (Mantel correlation tests and Mantel correlograms). Environmental
predictors explained greater proportion of taxonomic and functional composition variation
than spatial predictors. Functional and taxonomic turnover increased with increasing
geographic and environmental differences between plots, but once controlling for
environmental change spatial patterns in taxonomic and functional composition were no
longer observed. However, spatial structure in residual taxonomic and functional turnover was
observed when examining individual distance lags. This, together with the pure effect of
spatial predictors, suggests that community turnover is also explained by geographic
proximity between plots alone. Our results indicated the existence of a scale-dependent
interaction between deterministic and stochastic community assembly, showing that
community turnover results from species recruitment along regional spatially structured
environmental gradients, and from species limited dispersal at local scales. As such the
10
assessment of functional turnover hold great potential for estimating community assembly
mechanisms in this biome.

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