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Density and apparent survival of Myrmeciza exsul in landscapes with agricultural matrices Home-range and movements of Myrmeciza exsul (aves: thamnophilidae) in two fragmented landscapes in Costa Rica: evaluating functional connectivity :

by Finegan, B; Losada Prado, S; CATIE, Turrialba (Costa Rica); Losada Prado, S; CATIE, Turrialba (Costa Rica).
Publisher: Turrialba (Costa Rica) 2012Description: p.93-122; 122 p.Subject(s): PAJAROS | TIERRAS AGRICOLAS | PAISAJE | SOMBRA | HABITAT | COSTA RICA | BIRDS | FARMLAND | LANDSCAPE | SHADE | HABITATS | COSTA RICA | OISEAU | TERRE AGRICOLE | PAYSAGE | OMBRE | HABITAT | COSTA RICA | MYRMECIZA EXSUL | BOSQUE FRAGMENTADO | CONECTIVIDAD ESTRUCTURALOnline Resources: En Summary: Habitat fragmentation has negative effects on the demographic parameters (e.g., density and apparent survival rate) and body condition index of wildlife populations. These variables can be influenced by either habitat degradation or functional connectivity in the landscape. We evaluated density and apparent survival rate of Chestnut-backed Antbird (Myrmeciza exsul) in two regions in southwestern Costa Rica and compared the body condition index of M. exsul individuals from Los Cusingos Landscape (LCL) and Boruca Landscape (BOL) with individuals in fragmented regions in the Costa Rican lowlands in the Atlantic slope. We sampled forest fragments of varying sizes (0.16-10 ha) and continuous forest (> 100-ha) in both LCL and BOL. Density was estimated by using Distance Program and apparent survival rate through markrecapture analyses. We did not find significant differences in density values between regions and our average density was similar to that recorded in the primary forest of Barro Colorado Island (Panama). Apparent survival rate was influenced by time and sex in Los Cusingos Landscape (LCL), whereas in Boruca Landscape (BOL) apparent survival was not affected by these variables. Body condition index indicated M. exsul populations from LCL and BOL were not different to other populations in fragmented landscapes in Atlantic slope in Costa Rica. We considered that the stability of M. exsul populations is maintained by strategies such as territoriality and parental care during the post-fledging period. These aspects of the species’ biology are also potential factors influencing the evolution of small clutches in tropical birds.
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Habitat fragmentation has negative effects on the demographic parameters (e.g., density and apparent survival rate) and body condition index of wildlife populations. These variables can be influenced by either habitat degradation or functional connectivity in the landscape. We evaluated density and apparent survival rate of Chestnut-backed Antbird (Myrmeciza exsul) in two regions in southwestern Costa Rica and compared the body condition index of M. exsul individuals from Los Cusingos Landscape (LCL) and Boruca Landscape (BOL) with individuals in fragmented regions in the Costa Rican lowlands in the Atlantic slope. We sampled forest fragments of varying sizes (0.16-10 ha) and continuous forest (> 100-ha) in both LCL and BOL. Density was estimated by using Distance Program and apparent survival rate through markrecapture analyses. We did not find significant differences in density values between regions and our average density was similar to that recorded in the primary forest of Barro Colorado Island (Panama). Apparent survival rate was influenced by time and sex in Los Cusingos Landscape (LCL), whereas in Boruca Landscape (BOL) apparent survival was not affected by these variables. Body condition index indicated M. exsul populations from LCL and BOL were not different to other populations in fragmented landscapes in Atlantic slope in Costa Rica. We considered that the stability of M. exsul populations is maintained by strategies such as territoriality and parental care during the post-fledging period. These aspects of the species’ biology are also potential factors influencing the evolution of small clutches in tropical birds.

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