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Effects of the agricultural matrix on presence and movements of Myrmeciza exsul, a forest specialist bird, in two fragmented Costa Rican landscape Home-range and movements of Myrmeciza exsul (aves: thamnophilidae) in two fragmented landscapes in Costa Rica: evaluating functional connectivity

by Finegan, B; Losada Prado, S; Losada Prado, S; CATIE, Turrialba (Costa Rica); CATIE, Turrialba (Costa Rica).
Publisher: Turrialba (Costa Rica) 2012Description: p.70-92; 122 p.Subject(s): PAJAROS | TIERRAS AGRICOLAS | PAISAJE | SOMBRA | COSTA RICA | BIRDS | FARMLAND | LANDSCAPE | SHADE | COSTA RICA | OISEAU | TERRE AGRICOLE | PAYSAGE | OMBRE | COSTA RICA | MYRMECIZA EXSUL | BOSQUE FRAGMENTADO | CAFETALESOnline Resources: En Summary: Tropical forest fragments have long been considered as islands in fragmented landscapes and several studies find agricultural fields and cattle pastures a near absolute barrier to the movement of tropical forest birds. We tested the effects of several habitat types such as shaded coffee, sun-grown coffee, secondary growth vegetation, and cattle pastures on movements of Chestnut-backed Antbird (Myrmeciza exsul), a terrestrial forest insectivore. Using different methods (color-banded, radio-marked individuals, and song playbacks) and experiments, we showed M. exsul’s movements in shaded coffee crops and cattle pastures. Additionally, our observations support the idea that <1 ha forest fragments could be “stepping-stones” because they facilitate movements across the agricultural landscape, and we support the notion M. exsul may be a better disperser than other terrestrial insectivorous birds. Finally, we concluded that LCL is less restrictive to M. exsul’s movements than BOL and that shaded coffee plantations and secondary-growth vegetation contribute significantly to the dispersal of individuals.
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Tropical forest fragments have long been considered as islands in fragmented landscapes and several studies find agricultural fields and cattle pastures a near absolute barrier to the movement of tropical forest birds. We tested the effects of several habitat types such as shaded coffee, sun-grown coffee, secondary growth vegetation, and cattle pastures on movements of Chestnut-backed Antbird (Myrmeciza exsul), a terrestrial forest insectivore. Using different methods (color-banded, radio-marked individuals, and song playbacks) and experiments, we showed M. exsul’s movements in shaded coffee crops and cattle pastures. Additionally, our observations support the idea that <1 ha forest fragments could be “stepping-stones” because they facilitate movements across the agricultural landscape, and we support the notion M. exsul may be a better disperser than other terrestrial insectivorous birds. Finally, we concluded that LCL is less restrictive to M. exsul’s movements than BOL and that shaded coffee plantations and secondary-growth vegetation contribute significantly to the dispersal of individuals.

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