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Home-range size and movements of Chestnut-backed Antbird (Myrmeciza exsul), a forest specialist bird, in fragmented landscapes in southwestern Costa Rica Home-range and movements of Myrmeciza exsul (aves: thamnophilidae) in two fragmented landscapes in Costa Rica: evaluating functional connectivity

by Finegan, B; Casanoves, F; Declerck, F; Dunning, J; Losada Prado, S; Losada Prado, S; CATIE, Turrialba (Costa Rica); CATIE, Turrialba (Costa Rica).
Publisher: Turrialba (Costa Rica) 2012Description: p.31-69; 122 p.Subject(s): PAJAROS | TIERRAS AGRICOLAS | PAISAJE | COSTA RICA | BIRDS | FARMLAND | LANDSCAPE | COSTA RICA | OISEAU | TERRE AGRICOLE | PAYSAGE | COSTA RICA | MYRMECIZA EXSUL | THAMNOPHILIDAE | BOSQUE FRAGMENTAD | CONECTIVIDAD ESTRUCTURALOnline Resources: En Summary: The effect of fragmented landscapes on species dispersal is receiving significant attention with the aim of maintaining connectivity among animal populations. Landscape connectivity influences the spatial distribution of a species by making some areas accessible and others inaccessible. Among tropical birds, understory insectivorous species are among the most sensitive to fragmentation owing to their limited dispersal abilities. This sensitivity to dispersal makes the group potentially valuable as focal species for planning the connectivity of landscapes. Through telemetry methods, banded individuals, capture-recapture, and observations we evaluated individuals Chestnut-backed Antbird (Myrmeciza exsul), a common non-migratory understory insectivore with low mobility and a forest specialist, to determine its home-range size and movements within the agricultural matrix in two fragmented landscapes of southwestern Costa Rica. Los Cusingos Landscape (LCL) had 56% forest area, woodland, and pasture with treesSummary: additionally, crops such as coffee, sugar cane, and pasture occupied 34% of the land area. On the other hand, Boruca Landscape (BOL) had 31% forest cover, 23% pastures without trees, and 3% permanent crops such as coffee. We found significant differences (t = -3.52, p = 0.0018) between landscapes regarding home-range sizes, although daily movement distance was not different (t = -0.93, p = 0.3640) between landscapes. We estimated average home-ranges sizes with a 95% probability between 1.02 and 2.76 ha in LCL and between 0.77 and 1.80 ha in BOL. Additionally, average core areas (50% probability) were estimated between 0.14 and 1.08 ha in LCL and between 0.05 and 0.52 ha in BOL. Daily movement distances were 149 m/day and 125 m/day at LCL and BOL respectively. We registered movements of M. exsul through shaded coffee and across secondary roads (~12 m wide). To our knowledge this study is the first information regarding use of agricultural matrices by M. exsul in fragmented landscapes. We 33 concluded that M. exsul’s home-range size was greater in LCL than in BOL, while daily movement distance was not different between landscapes. Key words: Chestnut-backed Antbird, antbirds, home-range size, movements, agricultural landscape.
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The effect of fragmented landscapes on species dispersal is receiving significant attention with the aim of maintaining connectivity among animal populations. Landscape connectivity influences the spatial distribution of a species by making some areas accessible and others inaccessible. Among tropical birds, understory insectivorous species are among the most sensitive to fragmentation owing to their limited dispersal abilities. This sensitivity to dispersal makes the group potentially valuable as focal species for planning the connectivity of landscapes. Through telemetry methods, banded individuals, capture-recapture, and observations we evaluated individuals Chestnut-backed Antbird (Myrmeciza exsul), a common non-migratory understory insectivore with low mobility and a forest specialist, to determine its home-range size and movements within the agricultural matrix in two fragmented landscapes of southwestern Costa Rica. Los Cusingos Landscape (LCL) had 56% forest area, woodland, and pasture with trees

additionally, crops such as coffee, sugar cane, and pasture occupied 34% of the land area. On the other hand, Boruca Landscape (BOL) had 31% forest cover, 23% pastures without trees, and 3% permanent crops such as coffee. We found significant differences (t = -3.52, p = 0.0018) between landscapes regarding home-range sizes, although daily movement distance was not different (t = -0.93, p = 0.3640) between landscapes. We estimated average home-ranges sizes with a 95% probability between 1.02 and 2.76 ha in LCL and between 0.77 and 1.80 ha in BOL. Additionally, average core areas (50% probability) were estimated between 0.14 and 1.08 ha in LCL and between 0.05 and 0.52 ha in BOL. Daily movement distances were 149 m/day and 125 m/day at LCL and BOL respectively. We registered movements of M. exsul through shaded coffee and across secondary roads (~12 m wide). To our knowledge this study is the first information regarding use of agricultural matrices by M. exsul in fragmented landscapes. We 33 concluded that M. exsul’s home-range size was greater in LCL than in BOL, while daily movement distance was not different between landscapes. Key words: Chestnut-backed Antbird, antbirds, home-range size, movements, agricultural landscape.

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