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Mammal diversity, threats and knowledge across spatial scales

by Schipper, Gerrit J; University of Idaho, Moscow, ID (EUA); CATIE, Turrialba (Costa Rica).
Publisher: Turrialba (Costa Rica) 2010Description: 191 p.Subject(s): TELEDETECCION | MAMIFEROS | MAMIFEROS ACUATICOS | BIODIVERSIDAD | ZONAS PROTEGIDAS | CONSERVACION DE LOS RECURSOS | TOMA DE DECISIONES | COSTA RICA | REMOTE SENSING | MAMMALS | AQUATIC MAMMALS | BIODIVERSITY | PROTECTED AREAS | RESOURCE CONSERVATION | DECISION MAKING | COSTA RICA | TELEDETECTION | MAMMIFERE | MAMMIFERE AQUATIQUE | BIODIVERSITE | ZONE PROTEGEE | CONSERVATION DES RESSOURCES | PRISE DE DECISION | COSTA RICA | TALAMANCAOnline Resources: Texto completo (En) | En Summary: Herein we provide a global dataset and analysis framework to address declines in mammal populations and ultimately extinction risk. By making this data freely and publically available we hope that it can bring the best science to bear on decision making globally and nationally. Protected areas are among the most powerful tools available to protect species and populations within and between countries - thus at the regional scale we examine the effectiveness of land stewardship on mammal populations.Finally we examine this same landscape in terms of the need to broaden our ecological decision making parameters to include terrestrial, freshwater and marine components - and explore means by which ecological services transcend these biomes and why decision making need take all into consideration. We conclude that spatial scale is a fundamental issue that is often neglected in decision making and that in many cases conservation planning recommendations are either too broad or too specific in the context of the policy tools available. List(s) this item appears in: Mamíferos medianos y grandes MAV
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19 ilus. 10 tab. Bib. p. 174-184

Thesis (Ph. D.)

Herein we provide a global dataset and analysis framework to address declines in mammal populations and ultimately extinction risk. By making this data freely and publically available we hope that it can bring the best science to bear on decision making globally and nationally. Protected areas are among the most powerful tools available to protect species and populations within and between countries - thus at the regional scale we examine the effectiveness of land stewardship on mammal populations.Finally we examine this same landscape in terms of the need to broaden our ecological decision making parameters to include terrestrial, freshwater and marine components - and explore means by which ecological services transcend these biomes and why decision making need take all into consideration. We conclude that spatial scale is a fundamental issue that is often neglected in decision making and that in many cases conservation planning recommendations are either too broad or too specific in the context of the policy tools available.

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