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Financial analysis of shaded cocoa in Ghana

by Darko Obiri, B; Bright, G.A; McDonald, M.A; Anglaaere, L.C.N; Cobbina, J.
Publisher: (2007)ISSN: 0167-4366.Subject(s): THEOBROMA CACAO | PLANTACION | AGROFORESTERIA | ARBOLES | PLANTAS DE SOMBRA | ORGANISMOS INDIGENAS | BIODIVERSIDAD | ANALISIS DE COSTOS Y BENEFICIOS | ANALISIS ECONOMICO | RENTABILIDAD | CULTIVOS COMERCIALES | COSTOS | INGRESO EN EFECTIVO | GHANAOnline Resources: En In: Agroforestry Systems (Países Bajos) v. 71(2) p.139-149Summary: The cultivation of cocoa has been an important driver of tropical deforestation globally. Efforts to reverse this trend are focusing on the reintroduction of shade trees to cocoa plantations. Shade trees are valuable in enhancing biophysical conditions on cocoa (Theobroma cacao) fields and contribute to biodiversity and product diversification for smallholder producers. Paticipatory trials of cocoa agroforests planted with indigenous shade tree species were undertaken with farmers in the Atwima District of the Ashanti Region of Ghana, to increase tree volume on cocoa fields while improving rural livelihoods and enhancing environmental sustainability. An ex ante financial analysis of the technology was undertaken to assess its economic viability. Input-output data were collected from farmer experiments over three seasons and supplemented with data from traditional cocoa fields of variation in later year of an eighty-year cocoa rotation.
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The cultivation of cocoa has been an important driver of tropical deforestation globally. Efforts to reverse this trend are focusing on the reintroduction of shade trees to cocoa plantations. Shade trees are valuable in enhancing biophysical conditions on cocoa (Theobroma cacao) fields and contribute to biodiversity and product diversification for smallholder producers. Paticipatory trials of cocoa agroforests planted with indigenous shade tree species were undertaken with farmers in the Atwima District of the Ashanti Region of Ghana, to increase tree volume on cocoa fields while improving rural livelihoods and enhancing environmental sustainability. An ex ante financial analysis of the technology was undertaken to assess its economic viability. Input-output data were collected from farmer experiments over three seasons and supplemented with data from traditional cocoa fields of variation in later year of an eighty-year cocoa rotation.

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