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The abundance and population structure of some economically important trees of Piedras Blancas National Park, Costa Rica

by Guevara González, M; Siebert, S.F.
Publisher: 2001ISSN: 0304-3711.Subject(s): ARBOLES FORESTALES | LEGUMINOSAE | BOSQUES | PARQUES NACIONALES | COMUNIDADES VEGETALES | DENSIDAD DE LA POBLACION | CARACTERISTICAS DEL RODAL | BOSQUE TROPICAL HUMEDO | COSTA RICA | FOREST TREES | LEGUMINOSAE | FORESTS | NATIONAL PARKS | PLANT COMMUNITIES | POPULATION DENSITY | STAND CHARACTERISTICS | TROPICAL RAIN FORESTS | COSTA RICA | ARBRE FORESTIER | LEGUMINOSAE | FORET | PARC NATIONAL | COMMUNAUTE VEGETALE | DENSITE DE POPULATION | CARACTERISTIQUE DU PEUPLEMENT | FORET TROPICALE HUMIDE | COSTA RICA | CARAPA GUIANENSIS | PELTOGYNE | SYMPHONIA GLOBULIFERA | TERMINALIA AMAZONIA In: Brenesia (Costa Rica) (no.55-56) p. 69-80Summary: The abundance and population structures of nine locally important tree species (Brosimum utile, Carapa guianensis, Peltogyne purpurea, Qualea paraensis, Schizolobium parahyba, Symphonia globulifera, Tachigali versicolor, Terminalia amazonia and Vantanea barbourii) were investigated in primary, well-drained forest of Piedras Blancas National Park, Costa Rica. Seventy-five plots, each 0.04 ha, were established along three transects between 50 and 400 m elevation. In each plot, the number and diameter size classes (i.e., 2.5 to minor than 10 cm; 10-20 cm; 20-40 cm; 40-60 cm; 60-80 cm; major than 80 cm diameter at breast height) and the number of seedlings were recorded. We discerned three distinct patterns or types of diameter-size class distributions. Four species (B. utile, C. guianensis, Symphonia globulifera and Tachigali versicolor) exhibited a regular and continuous decrease in the number of individuals with increasing diameter (i.e., an inverse J population structure typical ofshade tolerant species). Four species (Q. paraensis, Schizolobium parahyba, Terminalia amazonia and V. barbourii) exhibited a marked decline in the number of individuals in the lower and middle size class characteristic of shade intolerant species. P. purpurea exhibited approximately the samenumber of individuals in all size classes suggesting intermediate shade tolerance. B. utile was the most abundant and widely distributed species exhibiting an average density of 27 individuals ( more than or equal to 25 cm dbh) ha-1 and a basal area of 3.2 m2. In general, shade-tolerant species were more abundant and widespread, while light demanding species exhibited a more patchy distribution. The population structures and shade tolerances of these economically important tree species have important implications for forest and protected areas management policies.
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The abundance and population structures of nine locally important tree species (Brosimum utile, Carapa guianensis, Peltogyne purpurea, Qualea paraensis, Schizolobium parahyba, Symphonia globulifera, Tachigali versicolor, Terminalia amazonia and Vantanea barbourii) were investigated in primary, well-drained forest of Piedras Blancas National Park, Costa Rica. Seventy-five plots, each 0.04 ha, were established along three transects between 50 and 400 m elevation. In each plot, the number and diameter size classes (i.e., 2.5 to minor than 10 cm; 10-20 cm; 20-40 cm; 40-60 cm; 60-80 cm; major than 80 cm diameter at breast height) and the number of seedlings were recorded. We discerned three distinct patterns or types of diameter-size class distributions. Four species (B. utile, C. guianensis, Symphonia globulifera and Tachigali versicolor) exhibited a regular and continuous decrease in the number of individuals with increasing diameter (i.e., an inverse J population structure typical ofshade tolerant species). Four species (Q. paraensis, Schizolobium parahyba, Terminalia amazonia and V. barbourii) exhibited a marked decline in the number of individuals in the lower and middle size class characteristic of shade intolerant species. P. purpurea exhibited approximately the samenumber of individuals in all size classes suggesting intermediate shade tolerance. B. utile was the most abundant and widely distributed species exhibiting an average density of 27 individuals ( more than or equal to 25 cm dbh) ha-1 and a basal area of 3.2 m2. In general, shade-tolerant species were more abundant and widespread, while light demanding species exhibited a more patchy distribution. The population structures and shade tolerances of these economically important tree species have important implications for forest and protected areas management policies.

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