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Antifeedant activity of Quassia amara (Simaroubaceae) extracts on Hypsipyla grandella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larvae

by Mancebo, F; Hilje, L; Mora, G.A; Salazar, R.
Publisher: Jun 2000ISSN: 0261-2194.Subject(s): QUASSIA AMARA | HYPSIPYLA GRANDELLA | CEDRELA ODORATA | HABITOS ALIMENTARIOS | INSECTOS DAÑINOS | EXTRACTOS VEGETALES | HYPSIPYLA GRANDELLA | CEDRELA ODORATA | FEEDING HABITS | PEST INSECTS | PLANT EXTRACTS | HYPSIPYLA GRANDELLA | CEDRELA ODORATA | COMPORTEMENT ALIMENTAIRE | INSECTE NUISIBLE | EXTRAIT D'ORIGINE VEGETALE In: Crop Protection (RU) v. 19(5) p. 301-305Summary: The inhibitory effect of methanolic wood and leaf extracts of bitterwood tree (Quassia amara) on mahogany shootborer (Hypsipyla grandella) larval feeding and growth was studied. A randomized complete block design, with four replications, was used. H. grandella third instar larvae were exposed for 24 h to Cedrela odorata leaf discs dipped in several treatment dissolutions of each extract (0.1, 0.316, 1.0, 3.162, and 10 percent); afterwards, each larva was transferred to a flask containing artificial diet, where it was allowed to complete its development. Variables measured included food consumption (foliar area eaten in 24 h), mortality, and developmental effects (developmental time for each larval instar and the pupa, and pupal weight). Both Q. amara extracts showed a clear antifeedant activity against H. grandella larvae, but it was higher for the wood extract; it was detected at a concentration as low as 0.32 percent for the wood extract and as high as 3.16 percent for the leaf extract.
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The inhibitory effect of methanolic wood and leaf extracts of bitterwood tree (Quassia amara) on mahogany shootborer (Hypsipyla grandella) larval feeding and growth was studied. A randomized complete block design, with four replications, was used. H. grandella third instar larvae were exposed for 24 h to Cedrela odorata leaf discs dipped in several treatment dissolutions of each extract (0.1, 0.316, 1.0, 3.162, and 10 percent); afterwards, each larva was transferred to a flask containing artificial diet, where it was allowed to complete its development. Variables measured included food consumption (foliar area eaten in 24 h), mortality, and developmental effects (developmental time for each larval instar and the pupa, and pupal weight). Both Q. amara extracts showed a clear antifeedant activity against H. grandella larvae, but it was higher for the wood extract; it was detected at a concentration as low as 0.32 percent for the wood extract and as high as 3.16 percent for the leaf extract.

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