Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Traditional fallows in Latin America :

by Kass, Donald; Somarriba Chávez, Eduardo.
Publisher: 1999ISSN: 0167-4366.Subject(s): MIMOSA SCABRELLA | CASSIA GUATEMALENSIS | PERYMENIUM GRANDE | MIMOSA | TENUIFLORA | GLIRICIDIA SEPIUM | BARBECHO | SISTEMAS CON BARBECHO | AGRICULTURA TRADICIONAL | SISTEMAS DE CULTIVO | CULTIVO MIGRATORIO | PALMA | PLANTAS LEÑOSAS | ARBUSTOS | MATORRAL | ARBOLES DE USO MULTIPLE | AGROFORESTERIA | ABONOS VERDES In: Agroforestry Systems (Países Bajos) volumen 47, Números (1-3), páginas 13-36Summary: The traditional fallow systems of Latin America have not been extensively studied from either a socioeconomic or biophysical viewpoint. Only in the past decade have some of these systems, including modified shifting cultivation in the Amazon, the bracatinga (Mimosa scabrella) fallow of southeastern Brazil, the babassu (Attalea spp.) system of the Amazon margins, and short bush fallows mostly for Phaseolus bean (the so-called 'frijol tapado'), received any attention. Over the past century, traditional cultivators have adopted several legumes such as Mucuna spp., Lathyrus nigrivalis, Canavalia spp., and Senna guatemalensis as green manures or managed fallows in food crop production systems, which have recently been the object of studies by social and biological scientists. Longer, monospecific fallows involving woody legumes have been studied to varying degrees. The legumes include Senna guatemalensis, Mimosa tenuiflora, and Gliricidia sepium. Systems in which crop production is alternated with animal grazing of secondary vegetation include the 'caatinga' of Northeast Brazil, the 'espinales' of Chile, the 'matorrales' of northern Mexico, and the 'chaco' of Argentina, Paragua, and Bolivia. A classification is proposed depending on the nature of the species (woody or nonwoody) and their composition (mono-or multispecies) and land management (burned or not). Much work is still needed in more complete characterization, determination of economic importance and potential, understanding the relationships among components, studies of nutrient cycling, and verification of the effects of shorter fallow periods of these systems.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
No physical items for this record

2 ilus. 3 tab. 71 ref.

The traditional fallow systems of Latin America have not been extensively studied from either a socioeconomic or biophysical viewpoint. Only in the past decade have some of these systems, including modified shifting cultivation in the Amazon, the bracatinga (Mimosa scabrella) fallow of southeastern Brazil, the babassu (Attalea spp.) system of the Amazon margins, and short bush fallows mostly for Phaseolus bean (the so-called 'frijol tapado'), received any attention. Over the past century, traditional cultivators have adopted several legumes such as Mucuna spp., Lathyrus nigrivalis, Canavalia spp., and Senna guatemalensis as green manures or managed fallows in food crop production systems, which have recently been the object of studies by social and biological scientists. Longer, monospecific fallows involving woody legumes have been studied to varying degrees. The legumes include Senna guatemalensis, Mimosa tenuiflora, and Gliricidia sepium. Systems in which crop production is alternated with animal grazing of secondary vegetation include the 'caatinga' of Northeast Brazil, the 'espinales' of Chile, the 'matorrales' of northern Mexico, and the 'chaco' of Argentina, Paragua, and Bolivia. A classification is proposed depending on the nature of the species (woody or nonwoody) and their composition (mono-or multispecies) and land management (burned or not). Much work is still needed in more complete characterization, determination of economic importance and potential, understanding the relationships among components, studies of nutrient cycling, and verification of the effects of shorter fallow periods of these systems.

Click on an image to view it in the image viewer