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Soil phosphorus fractions in agroforestry systems: effect of soil depth and sampling time

by Kass, D.C.L; Somarriba, E; Macedo, J.L.V. de.
Publisher: 1999ISSN: 0966-8616.Subject(s): FRACCIONES DEL SUELO | FOSFORO | MUESTREO | TIPOS DE SUELO | TEXTURA DEL SUELO | DISPONIBILIDAD DE NUTRIENTES | AGROFORESTERIA | SOIL SEPARATES | PHOSPHORUS | SAMPLING | SOIL TEXTURE | NUTRIENT AVAILABILITY | AGROFORESTRY | FRACTION DU SOL | PHOSPHORE | ECHANTILLONNAGE | TEXTURE DU SOL | DISPONIBILITE D'ELEMENT NUTRITIF | AGROFORESTERIE In: Agroforestry Forum (RU) v. 9(4) p. 42-49Summary: Since its development in 1982, a sequential extraction procedure proposed by Hedley has been used to separate soil phosphorus (P) into labile and less labile organic and inorganic components. More recently, the procedure has been used to characterize changes in soil P under agroforestry systems. However, correlation with plant response has been poor and several publications have shown that factors such as soil type, soil texture, and nutrient status can affect the size of the different fractions as much as management practices. In the present article, we examine whether depth and time of sampling can also affect the size and distribution of the P fractions and their relationship to plant response.
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Since its development in 1982, a sequential extraction procedure proposed by Hedley has been used to separate soil phosphorus (P) into labile and less labile organic and inorganic components. More recently, the procedure has been used to characterize changes in soil P under agroforestry systems. However, correlation with plant response has been poor and several publications have shown that factors such as soil type, soil texture, and nutrient status can affect the size of the different fractions as much as management practices. In the present article, we examine whether depth and time of sampling can also affect the size and distribution of the P fractions and their relationship to plant response.

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