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Aportes del MIP a los sistemas de producción sostenible de cultivos de café, granos básicos, hortalizas y musaceas

by Bustamante, E; Guharay, F; Hilje, L; Monterroso, D; Rivas, G; Sánchez, V; Shannon, P; Staver, C; Valverde, B; CATIE, Turrialba (Costa Rica). Programa de Investigación; 3. Semana Científica Turrialba (Costa Rica) 3-5 Feb 1997.
Publisher: Turrialba (Costa Rica) 1997Description: p. 181-184.Subject(s): COFFEA | GRANOS BASICOS | HORTALIZAS | CONTROL DE PLAGAS | CONTROL INTEGRADO | PLAGAS DE PLANTAS | MUSACEAE | SOSTENIBILIDAD | CATIE | AMERICA CENTRAL | COFFEA | VEGETABLES | PEST CONTROL | PESTS OF PLANTS | MUSACEAE | SUSTAINABILITY | CENTRAL AMERICA | COFFEA | LEGUME | LUTTE ANTIRAVAGEUR | RAVAGEUR DES PLANTES | MUSACEAE | DURABILITE | AMERIQUE CENTRALESummary: The integrated pest management (IPM) is an important component of the agricultural sustainable production system. CATIE have developed IPM activities in Central America since 1984, especially in pest of coffee, corn, plantains and tomato. The strategic inputs for sustainability studied during 1996 were as follows: biology and phenology of the whitefly-geminivirus complex; cultural practices for insect pathogen and weed control like cover plants, plant extracts and nutrients; host plant resistance to Phytophthora infestans and geminivirus in tomato. The biological control with microorganisms, especially bacteria and fungi, was the more widely input studied to get alternatives in the management of pest like white grubs, in maize, black weevil and black sigatoka of bananas and plantains, late blight and geminivirus in tomato and yam antracnosis. Besides microorganisms, nutritional substracts and fast compost were also studied. Most of these inputs would contribute to the pest management in agroecology production systems in the near future.
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Sum. (En)

The integrated pest management (IPM) is an important component of the agricultural sustainable production system. CATIE have developed IPM activities in Central America since 1984, especially in pest of coffee, corn, plantains and tomato. The strategic inputs for sustainability studied during 1996 were as follows: biology and phenology of the whitefly-geminivirus complex; cultural practices for insect pathogen and weed control like cover plants, plant extracts and nutrients; host plant resistance to Phytophthora infestans and geminivirus in tomato. The biological control with microorganisms, especially bacteria and fungi, was the more widely input studied to get alternatives in the management of pest like white grubs, in maize, black weevil and black sigatoka of bananas and plantains, late blight and geminivirus in tomato and yam antracnosis. Besides microorganisms, nutritional substracts and fast compost were also studied. Most of these inputs would contribute to the pest management in agroecology production systems in the near future.

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