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Comparación de dos métodos de resinación en Pinus oocarpa, P. montezumae y P. pseudostrobus, cuenca río Chixoy, Guatemala

by López Rucuch, R; Flores Corrales, J; CATIE, Turrialba (Costa Rica). Programa de Investigación; 3. Semana Científica Turrialba (Costa Rica) 3-5 Feb 1997.
Publisher: Turrialba (Costa Rica) 1997Description: p. 79-84.Subject(s): PINUS OOCARPA | PINUS MONTEZUMAE | PINUS PSEUDOSTROBUS | RESINACION | ACIDO SULFURICO | LEVADURA | COSTOS | PRODUCTOS FORESTALES NO MADERABLES | CUENCAS HIDROGRAFICAS | RIO CHIXOY | GUATEMALA | PINUS OOCARPA | PINUS MONTEZUMAE | PINUS PSEUDOSTROBUS | TAPPING | SULPHURIC ACID | YEASTS | COSTS | WATERSHEDS | GUATEMALA | PINUS OOCARPA | PINUS MONTEZUMAE | PINUS PSEUDOSTROBUS | SAIGNEE | ACIDE SULFURIQUE | LEVURE | COUT | BASSIN VERSANT | GUATEMALASummary: Resin from pine trees and its by-products have been used by man since ancient times and they appear in the old cultures arround the world. The primary by products are colophony and turpentine oil, which are presently utilized for manufacturing paints, varnishes, lacquers, paper and cardboard gluing, lubricants, emulsifying oils, unguents, desinfectants and soaps, and for painting lessening and varnishes respectively. The present study was carried out, during the March-August 1996 period, in Momostenango, San Antonio Ilotenango and Santa Cruz del Quiché Municipalities, Guatemala where resin yields in the species Pinus oocarpa, P. montezumae and P. pseudostrobus were evaluated by applying the following resinating methods: crown and canal with paste sulfuric acid as stimulant; and descendent fish spine with yeast extract as stimulant. The objetives of this study were to evaluate resin yield in gr/tree in the three above mentioned species to determine the best resinating method, the best stimulant, the best diametric class, and to determine production costs/kg for resin for the two resinating methods. The Aleman's method was found to be better than the American's method; yeast extract was also a better stimulant than the paste sulfuric acid for the species studied. It was also proved that the 40-45 dap diametric class resulted in higher resin yields in P. oocarpa and P. pseudostrobus, but not in P. montezumae where no significant differences were found between diametric classes. Weekly general averages for resin yields were 141 gr/tree in P. oocarpa, 134 gr/tree in P. pseudostrobus and 131 gr/tree in P. montezumae in the 16 treatments. Production costs/kg of resin using the fish spine method is lower when compared with the American's method. Consequently, the descendent fish spine method presented the highest profitability, the same applies for the three species studied.
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Resin from pine trees and its by-products have been used by man since ancient times and they appear in the old cultures arround the world. The primary by products are colophony and turpentine oil, which are presently utilized for manufacturing paints, varnishes, lacquers, paper and cardboard gluing, lubricants, emulsifying oils, unguents, desinfectants and soaps, and for painting lessening and varnishes respectively. The present study was carried out, during the March-August 1996 period, in Momostenango, San Antonio Ilotenango and Santa Cruz del Quiché Municipalities, Guatemala where resin yields in the species Pinus oocarpa, P. montezumae and P. pseudostrobus were evaluated by applying the following resinating methods: crown and canal with paste sulfuric acid as stimulant; and descendent fish spine with yeast extract as stimulant. The objetives of this study were to evaluate resin yield in gr/tree in the three above mentioned species to determine the best resinating method, the best stimulant, the best diametric class, and to determine production costs/kg for resin for the two resinating methods. The Aleman's method was found to be better than the American's method; yeast extract was also a better stimulant than the paste sulfuric acid for the species studied. It was also proved that the 40-45 dap diametric class resulted in higher resin yields in P. oocarpa and P. pseudostrobus, but not in P. montezumae where no significant differences were found between diametric classes. Weekly general averages for resin yields were 141 gr/tree in P. oocarpa, 134 gr/tree in P. pseudostrobus and 131 gr/tree in P. montezumae in the 16 treatments. Production costs/kg of resin using the fish spine method is lower when compared with the American's method. Consequently, the descendent fish spine method presented the highest profitability, the same applies for the three species studied.

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