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A study of the importance of shading in native species trials for reforestation of abandoned pasture in the Sarapiqui Region, Costa Rica

by Best, L; University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham (RU). Geography Degree Course.
Publisher: Edgbaston, Birmingham (RU) 1988Description: 65 p.Subject(s): REFORESTACION | TIERRAS ABANDONADAS | PASTIZALES | PLANTAS DE SOMBRA | ROLLINIA MICROCEPHALA | VITEX COOPERI | DALBERGIA TUCURENSIS | EUCALYPTUS SALIGNA | PINUS PATULA | CRECIMIENTO | REHABILITACION DE TIERRAS | SARAPIQUI | COSTA RICA | REFORESTATION | ABANDONED LAND | PASTURES | SHADE PLANTS | EUCALYPTUS SALIGNA | PINUS PATULA | GROWTH | RECLAMATION | COSTA RICA | RECONSTITUTION FORESTIERE | TERRE ABANDONNEE | PATURAGES | PLANTE D'OMBRAGE | EUCALYPTUS SALIGNA | PINUS PATULA | CROISSANCE | RECUPERATION DES SOLS | COSTA RICASummary: This paper examines the effect of shade trees on the growth of native tree seedlings in two trial plantations on abandoned pasture land in the Sarapiqui Region of Costa Rica. Six month growth increments for twenty-two trial tree species are compared with percentage shade cover to determine any preferences for sun or shade. Only five of the species studied showed a significant relationship between growth and shade in regression analysis. Rollinia microsepala and Vitex cooperi, both shade tolerant, showed greater growth with increasing shade. Differences in growth increments between shade categories and full sun growth were shown to be significant in a one-way analysis of variance (1 percent level), and both species produced best growth at shade of 60-80 percent and above. The three species Dalbergia tucurensis, Eucalyptus saligna and Pinus patula all showed negative relationships, significant in the regression analysis. ANOVA showed that differences in growth of D. tucurensis between shade categories and sun were not significant, though a low shade cover would appear advantageous. Both E. saligna and P. patula showed significantly greater growth at low shade in preference to full sun, despite their known light preferences. In all the relationships indicated a certain level of shade seemed necessary for best growth results.
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This paper examines the effect of shade trees on the growth of native tree seedlings in two trial plantations on abandoned pasture land in the Sarapiqui Region of Costa Rica. Six month growth increments for twenty-two trial tree species are compared with percentage shade cover to determine any preferences for sun or shade. Only five of the species studied showed a significant relationship between growth and shade in regression analysis. Rollinia microsepala and Vitex cooperi, both shade tolerant, showed greater growth with increasing shade. Differences in growth increments between shade categories and full sun growth were shown to be significant in a one-way analysis of variance (1 percent level), and both species produced best growth at shade of 60-80 percent and above. The three species Dalbergia tucurensis, Eucalyptus saligna and Pinus patula all showed negative relationships, significant in the regression analysis. ANOVA showed that differences in growth of D. tucurensis between shade categories and sun were not significant, though a low shade cover would appear advantageous. Both E. saligna and P. patula showed significantly greater growth at low shade in preference to full sun, despite their known light preferences. In all the relationships indicated a certain level of shade seemed necessary for best growth results.

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