Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The effect of income on the extraction of non-timber tropical forest products: model, hypotheses, and preliminary findings from the Sumu Indians of Nicaragua

by Godoy, R; Brokaw, N; Wilkie, D.
Publisher: 1995ISSN: 0300-7839.Subject(s): PRODUCTOS FORESTALES NO MADERABLES | SOSTENIBILIDAD | VALORACION ECONOMICA | DESARROLLO ECONOMICO | GRUPOS ETNICOS | NICARAGUA | SUSTAINABILITY | ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT | ETHNIC GROUPS | NICARAGUA | DURABILITE | DEVELOPPEMENT ECONOMIQUE | GROUPE ETHNIQUE | NICARAGUA In: Human Ecology (EUA) v. 23(1) p. 29-52Summary: We use microeconomic theory to frame hypotheses about the effects of income on the use of non-timber rain forest products. We hypothesize that an increase in income: (a) encourages foraging specialization, resulting in the extraction of fewer goods; (b) increases the share of household income from occupations besides foraging; (c) produces a yearly value from the extraction of nontimber forest goods of about 50 per hectare; and (d) produces depleiton of forest goods entering commercial channels and sustainable extraction of goods facing cheaper industrial substitutes. To examine these hypotheses we present worldwide ethnographic information and preliminary findings from field work carried out among the Sumu Indians of Nicaragua. Field work suggests that higher income produces: (a) foraging specialization with animals rather than with plants; (b) a decline in the economic importance of forest goods in household income; (c) and a rise in the value of non-timber goods removed from the forest to about 35/ha/year. We did not have time to test hypothesis "d".
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
No physical items for this record

5 fig. 1 tab. Bib. p. 48-52. Sum. (En)

We use microeconomic theory to frame hypotheses about the effects of income on the use of non-timber rain forest products. We hypothesize that an increase in income: (a) encourages foraging specialization, resulting in the extraction of fewer goods; (b) increases the share of household income from occupations besides foraging; (c) produces a yearly value from the extraction of nontimber forest goods of about 50 per hectare; and (d) produces depleiton of forest goods entering commercial channels and sustainable extraction of goods facing cheaper industrial substitutes. To examine these hypotheses we present worldwide ethnographic information and preliminary findings from field work carried out among the Sumu Indians of Nicaragua. Field work suggests that higher income produces: (a) foraging specialization with animals rather than with plants; (b) a decline in the economic importance of forest goods in household income; (c) and a rise in the value of non-timber goods removed from the forest to about 35/ha/year. We did not have time to test hypothesis "d".

Click on an image to view it in the image viewer