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The alkaloids of Erythrina : clonal evaluation and metabolic fate

by Payne, L.D; Louisiana State Univ., Davis, La. (EUA). Graduate Faculty.
Publisher: Davis, La. (EUA) 1991Description: 161 p.Subject(s): ERYTHRINA | ALCALOIDES | CLONES | CROMATOGRAFIA DE GASES | ESPECTROMETRIA DE MASAS | TECNICAS ANALITICAS | BIOSINTESIS | TRASTORNOS METABOLICOS | ERYTHRINA | ALKALOIDS | CLONES | GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY | MASS SPECTROMETRY | ANALYTICAL METHODS | BIOSYNTHESIS | METABOLIC DISORDERS | ERYTHRINA | ALCALOIDE | CLONE | CHROMATOGRAPHIE EN PHASE GAZEUSE | SPECTROMETRIE DE MASSE | TECHNIQUE ANALYTIQUE | BIOSYNTHESE | TROUBLE DU METABOLISMESummary: Synthetic experiments demonstrated that the dihydroerythroidine isomers present in the milk and rumen samples were not the same isomers produced by catalitic hydrogenation. During catalytic hydrogenation, the conjugated diene in B-erythroidine is reduced to a single double bond at the 1-6 position. Mass spectral data indicate that the conjugated diene is conserved during hydrogenation of B-erythroidine in the rumen and that the double bond in the lactone ring may be hydrogenated. Synthetically derived dihydroerythroidine is ten times more potent than the parent drug, B-erythroidine, therefore there is a possibility that the presence of biologically hydrogenated dihydroerythroidines in the milk of goats which consume Erythrina foliage may pose a health hazard to individuals consuming the contaminated milk.
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Bib. p. 111-126. Sum. (En)

Tesis (Ph D)

Synthetic experiments demonstrated that the dihydroerythroidine isomers present in the milk and rumen samples were not the same isomers produced by catalitic hydrogenation. During catalytic hydrogenation, the conjugated diene in B-erythroidine is reduced to a single double bond at the 1-6 position. Mass spectral data indicate that the conjugated diene is conserved during hydrogenation of B-erythroidine in the rumen and that the double bond in the lactone ring may be hydrogenated. Synthetically derived dihydroerythroidine is ten times more potent than the parent drug, B-erythroidine, therefore there is a possibility that the presence of biologically hydrogenated dihydroerythroidines in the milk of goats which consume Erythrina foliage may pose a health hazard to individuals consuming the contaminated milk.

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