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by Zamora, L. comps; Muschler, R.G; Echeverri, J; IICA, San José (Costa Rica). PROMECAFE; Instituto del Café de Costa Rica, San José (Costa Rica); 19. Simposio Latinoamericano de Caficultura San José (Costa Rica) 2-6 Oct 2000.
Publisher: San José (Costa Rica) 2000Description: p. 109-123; 514 p.ISBN: 9977550247.Other Title: Shade improves coffee quality in a sub-optimal zone of Costa Rica.Subject(s): CULTIVO BAJO SOMBRA | CATURRA | CATIMOR | COFFEA ARABICA | CULTIVO | SOMBRA | CALIDAD | ACIDEZ | SABOR | ARBOLES DE SOMBRA | ERYTHRINA POEPPIGIANA | COFFEA ARABICA | CULTIVATION | SHADE | QUALITY | ACIDITY | FLAVOUR | SHADE TREES | ERYTHRINA POEPPIGIANA | COFFEA ARABICA | PRATIQUE CULTURALE | OMBRE | QUALITE | ACIDITE | FLAVEUR | ARBRE D'OMBRAGE | ERYTHRINA POEPPIGIANASummary: The development of environmentally sustainable coffee production using agroforestry systems needs to consider not only the effects of trees on the environment and long-term coffee production, but also on coffee quality. This study compared coffee quality of Coffea arabica L. vars. Caturra and Catimor 5175 under different levels of shade in a low-elevation, sub-optimal environment for coffee in Costa Rica. Fruit weight and bean size increased significantly when shade intensity was increased from 0 percent to more than 80 percent under unpruned Erythrina poeppigiana. While large beans (diameter > 17/64ths of an inch [6.7 mm]) accounted for 49 and 43 percent of the coffee from unshaded Caturra and Catimor, respectively, these proportions increased to 69 and 72 percent under dense permanent shade. This suggested a stronger shade benefit for Catimor than for Caturra. The conversion percentages from fresh-weight coffee fruits to dry-weight green coffee for export were not affected by the treatments. A blind tasting experiment showed consistent shade-induced improvements in appearance of green and roasted coffee as well as in acidity and body of the brew for both varieties. The effect of shade on aroma of the brew was neutral for Caturra and slightly negative for Catimor. In the sub-optimal low-elevation environment studied, typical for many coffee areas, it is hypothesized that shading, primarily through reduced heat loads, permits slower and more balanced grain filling and ripening, yielding a higher-quality product than without shade. Shade experiments along environmental gradients should help to validate this conjecture.
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The development of environmentally sustainable coffee production using agroforestry systems needs to consider not only the effects of trees on the environment and long-term coffee production, but also on coffee quality. This study compared coffee quality of Coffea arabica L. vars. Caturra and Catimor 5175 under different levels of shade in a low-elevation, sub-optimal environment for coffee in Costa Rica. Fruit weight and bean size increased significantly when shade intensity was increased from 0 percent to more than 80 percent under unpruned Erythrina poeppigiana. While large beans (diameter > 17/64ths of an inch [6.7 mm]) accounted for 49 and 43 percent of the coffee from unshaded Caturra and Catimor, respectively, these proportions increased to 69 and 72 percent under dense permanent shade. This suggested a stronger shade benefit for Catimor than for Caturra. The conversion percentages from fresh-weight coffee fruits to dry-weight green coffee for export were not affected by the treatments. A blind tasting experiment showed consistent shade-induced improvements in appearance of green and roasted coffee as well as in acidity and body of the brew for both varieties. The effect of shade on aroma of the brew was neutral for Caturra and slightly negative for Catimor. In the sub-optimal low-elevation environment studied, typical for many coffee areas, it is hypothesized that shading, primarily through reduced heat loads, permits slower and more balanced grain filling and ripening, yielding a higher-quality product than without shade. Shade experiments along environmental gradients should help to validate this conjecture.

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