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Effect of long-term application of phosphorus on the availability forms and uptake of P by coffee

by Thimma Reddy, H; Shanmukhappa, D.R; D'Souza, M.V; Krishnappa Naik, C.S; Jayarama.
Publisher: 1991Subject(s): COFFEA ARABICA | ABONOS FOSFATADOS | APLICACION DE FERTILIZANTES | ABSORCION DE SUBSTANCIAS NUTRITIVAS | NUTRIENTES | COFFEA ARABICA | PHOSPHATE FERTILIZERS | NUTRIENTS | COFFEA ARABICA | ENGRAIS PHOSPHATE | SUBSTANCE NUTRITIVE In: Journal of Coffee Research (India) v.21(2) p. 127-134Summary: Phosphorus is considered to be one of the most immobile plant nutrients in soils. Under highly weathered conditions over long periods of time and continuos application of P fertilizers, soil phosphorus undergoes significant changes both in chemical form and its location in the soil profile (Walker and Syers, 1976). Fractionation of soil phosphorus in such soils helps in understanding the fate of applied fertilizers. It was found that about 70 to 80 per cent of the applied P is unavailable to coffee plants due to high fixation (Naik et al., 1988). Thus it is very essential to know the forms of P that are present in coffee soils amended with high doses of various water soluble and insoluble phosphatic fertilizers continuosly. Since, information on the fate of applied P in coffee soils in lacking, the present study was initiated to know the transformation of applied P into different forms of phosphorus in these soils and their importance to coffee plants.
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Phosphorus is considered to be one of the most immobile plant nutrients in soils. Under highly weathered conditions over long periods of time and continuos application of P fertilizers, soil phosphorus undergoes significant changes both in chemical form and its location in the soil profile (Walker and Syers, 1976). Fractionation of soil phosphorus in such soils helps in understanding the fate of applied fertilizers. It was found that about 70 to 80 per cent of the applied P is unavailable to coffee plants due to high fixation (Naik et al., 1988). Thus it is very essential to know the forms of P that are present in coffee soils amended with high doses of various water soluble and insoluble phosphatic fertilizers continuosly. Since, information on the fate of applied P in coffee soils in lacking, the present study was initiated to know the transformation of applied P into different forms of phosphorus in these soils and their importance to coffee plants.

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