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The acids of coffee

by Maier, H.G; Association Scientifique Internationale du Café, París (Francia); 12. International Scientific Colloquium on Coffee Montreal (Canadá) 29 Jun - 3 Jul 1987.
Publisher: París (Francia) 1988Description: p. 229-237.Other Title: Report.Subject(s): CAFE | CAFE VERDE | CAFE TOSTADO | ACIDOS | COMPUESTOS VOLATILES | COMPOSICION | ANALISIS QUIMICO | PROPIEDADES ORGANOLEPTICAS | COFFEE | ACIDS | ORGANOLEPTIC PROPERTIES | CAFE | ACIDE | PROPRIETE ORGANOLEPTIQUESummary: A survey of the individual acids in green, roasted and instant coffee is given. Discussed is the fate of chlorogenic, citric and malic acids during roasting and the origin of several acids that are formed during roasting. Stressed is the difference between Arabicas and Robustas. In green coffee, the acid contents are about equal, chlorogenic, citric, high molecular, quinic and malic acids being the most prevailing. In roasted coffee these are acetic and high molecular acids, followed by formic and quinic or chlorogenic acids. A method for calculating the sensory importance is outlined. According to these calculations, the greater intensity of acid taste in infusions of roasted Arabicas in comparison with Robustas is due to three factors: the higher content of acids in roasted beans, the somewhat higher proportion of free acid groups and the greater sensory effectiveness of the prevailing individual acids
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++ 3 tab. 15 ref. Sum. (En, Fr) p. 30

A survey of the individual acids in green, roasted and instant coffee is given. Discussed is the fate of chlorogenic, citric and malic acids during roasting and the origin of several acids that are formed during roasting. Stressed is the difference between Arabicas and Robustas. In green coffee, the acid contents are about equal, chlorogenic, citric, high molecular, quinic and malic acids being the most prevailing. In roasted coffee these are acetic and high molecular acids, followed by formic and quinic or chlorogenic acids. A method for calculating the sensory importance is outlined. According to these calculations, the greater intensity of acid taste in infusions of roasted Arabicas in comparison with Robustas is due to three factors: the higher content of acids in roasted beans, the somewhat higher proportion of free acid groups and the greater sensory effectiveness of the prevailing individual acids

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