Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Effect of caffeine on growth feed efficiency and leanness of growing pigs and its interaction with calcium zinc and corn oil

by Cunningham, H.M.
Publisher: 1971Subject(s): SUBPRODUCTOS | ALIMENTOS PARA ANIMALES | CAFEINA | CERDO | BYPRODUCTS | ANIMAL FEEDING STUFFS | CAFFEINE | SWINE | SOUS PRODUIT | CAFEINE | PORCIN In: Canadian Journal of Animal Science (Canadá) v. 51(1) p. 95-102Summary: A series of four experiments was conducted to determine the effectiveness of caffeine in promoting increased leannes and feed efficiency in self-fed pigs. A level of 1,5 g of caffeine per kg of feed was one of the most effective levels tested in increasing carcass leanness, but some pigs developed a skin rash which restricted growth rate and reduced feed efficiency. This was accentuated by high levels of dietary zinc or calcium and, in one of two experiments, by a level of 3 corn oil. When a level of 1.0 g/kg of caffeine was used, there was no skin rash, little or no reduction in growth rate, and a slight but nonsignificant increase in feed efficiency. Depth of backfat was significantly reduced (P<0.01) and the carcass protein: fat ratio was 14-16 higher than in controls. No advantage was found in gradually increasing the caffeine content of the ration from 0.5 g/kg at weaning to 1.5 g/kg eight weeds later, compared with feeding 1.0 g/kg throughout the entire growing, finishing period
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
No physical items for this record

++Dat. num. 12 ref. Sum. (En)

A series of four experiments was conducted to determine the effectiveness of caffeine in promoting increased leannes and feed efficiency in self-fed pigs. A level of 1,5 g of caffeine per kg of feed was one of the most effective levels tested in increasing carcass leanness, but some pigs developed a skin rash which restricted growth rate and reduced feed efficiency. This was accentuated by high levels of dietary zinc or calcium and, in one of two experiments, by a level of 3 corn oil. When a level of 1.0 g/kg of caffeine was used, there was no skin rash, little or no reduction in growth rate, and a slight but nonsignificant increase in feed efficiency. Depth of backfat was significantly reduced (P<0.01) and the carcass protein: fat ratio was 14-16 higher than in controls. No advantage was found in gradually increasing the caffeine content of the ration from 0.5 g/kg at weaning to 1.5 g/kg eight weeds later, compared with feeding 1.0 g/kg throughout the entire growing, finishing period

Click on an image to view it in the image viewer