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Biological and ecological studies of the giant looper. A. selenaria W.K., 1

Publisher: Abr 1972Subject(s): INSECTOS DAÑINOS | LEPIDOPTERA | ECOLOGIA | BIOLOGIA | COMPORTAMIENTO | DIAPAUSA | OVIPOSICION | ASCOTIS SELENARIA RECIPROCARIA | BIOLOGIA DE INSECTOS | LEPIDOPTERA | ECOLOGY | BIOLOGY | BEHAVIOUR | DIAPAUSE | OVIPOSITION | LEPIDOPTERA | ECOLOGIE | BIOLOGIE | COMPORTEMENT | DIAPAUSE | PONTE In: Kenya Coffee (Kenia) v. 36(433) p. 114-115Summary: Coffee Research Station, Ruiru, Kenya. Although the giant looper, Ascotis selenaria reciprocaria, is no longer a serious threat to coffee, it is still of sufficient importance to require attention. Its biology was described by Wheatley (1964) but very little of its ecology in Kenya coffee plantations has been investigated. Indeed the giant looper is an example of pests for which chemical control measures have been devised before there was sufficient knowledge of its ecology and behaviour of the pest we are dealing with. We have recently investigated the resting behaviour of moths in the field, the distribution of eggs on coffee tree stems, and the number of times a female mates. From these studies it was hoped to gain information on the cultural measures required to reduce infestion. Simultaneous laboratory studies were conduced to determine the life-span of both sexes of moths and the fecundity and fertility of mated females
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Coffee Research Station, Ruiru, Kenya. Although the giant looper, Ascotis selenaria reciprocaria, is no longer a serious threat to coffee, it is still of sufficient importance to require attention. Its biology was described by Wheatley (1964) but very little of its ecology in Kenya coffee plantations has been investigated. Indeed the giant looper is an example of pests for which chemical control measures have been devised before there was sufficient knowledge of its ecology and behaviour of the pest we are dealing with. We have recently investigated the resting behaviour of moths in the field, the distribution of eggs on coffee tree stems, and the number of times a female mates. From these studies it was hoped to gain information on the cultural measures required to reduce infestion. Simultaneous laboratory studies were conduced to determine the life-span of both sexes of moths and the fecundity and fertility of mated females

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