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A associaçao do ácaro Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes)

by Chagas, C.M.
Publisher: 1973Subject(s): COFFEA ARABICA | VECTORES | SINTOMAS DE ENFERMEDADES (PLANTAS) | VIROSIS | ACAROS NOCIVOS | MANCHAS | MUNDO NOVO | BREVIPALPUS PHOENICIS | COFFEA ARABICA | VECTORS | VIROSES | PEST MITES | SPOTS | BREVIPALPUS PHOENICIS | COFFEA ARABICA | VECTEUR DE MALADIE | VIROSE | ACARIEN NUISIBLE | TACHE | BREVIPALPUS PHOENICIS In: Biológico (Brasil) v. 39(9) p. 229-232Summary: Mites collected in December 1972 from leaves of several coffee trees showing typical symptoms of coffee ringspot (CR) have been determined as Brevipalpus phoenicis by Prof. Donald M. Tuttle from Arizona University, U.S.A. Similar mites collected at the same time in the same place were tranferred to ten young healthy plants of Coffea arabica L. var. Mundo Novo, using ten mites per plant, which were kept into a glass closed in the glasshouse. Ten comparable plants were kept under the same conditions as control. In a further experiment carried out in June 1973, five more plants were equally infested, and individually maintained under a glass protector. Other five non infested plants were comparably kept as control. In the first experiment, symptoms appeared on 3 of the 10 plants, as chlorotic spots, 30-40 days after infestation and developped typical ringspot lesions in 60 days (Fig. 1-A). Control non-infested plants showed no symptoms. In the 2nd experiment, 4 out of the 5 infested plants also showed typical symptoms, while the control remained normal. These results and those found in the literature led to the following conclusions. 1. B. phoenicis is closely associated with CR and is probably its vector. 2. Since Citrus leprosis and CR have similar symptomatology and similar virus-liked particles associated with both (4,5), the fact that the same mite is also associated with both strenghens the hypothesis that they have the same or related etiology (4). 3. The association of B. phoenicis also with CR strengthens still more the generally accepted assumption of the viral nature of the viral nature of the disease
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++ Ilus. 18 ref. Sum. (En)

Mites collected in December 1972 from leaves of several coffee trees showing typical symptoms of coffee ringspot (CR) have been determined as Brevipalpus phoenicis by Prof. Donald M. Tuttle from Arizona University, U.S.A. Similar mites collected at the same time in the same place were tranferred to ten young healthy plants of Coffea arabica L. var. Mundo Novo, using ten mites per plant, which were kept into a glass closed in the glasshouse. Ten comparable plants were kept under the same conditions as control. In a further experiment carried out in June 1973, five more plants were equally infested, and individually maintained under a glass protector. Other five non infested plants were comparably kept as control. In the first experiment, symptoms appeared on 3 of the 10 plants, as chlorotic spots, 30-40 days after infestation and developped typical ringspot lesions in 60 days (Fig. 1-A). Control non-infested plants showed no symptoms. In the 2nd experiment, 4 out of the 5 infested plants also showed typical symptoms, while the control remained normal. These results and those found in the literature led to the following conclusions. 1. B. phoenicis is closely associated with CR and is probably its vector. 2. Since Citrus leprosis and CR have similar symptomatology and similar virus-liked particles associated with both (4,5), the fact that the same mite is also associated with both strenghens the hypothesis that they have the same or related etiology (4). 3. The association of B. phoenicis also with CR strengthens still more the generally accepted assumption of the viral nature of the viral nature of the disease

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