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Effects of burning of rubber timber during land preparation on soil fertility and growth of Theobroma cacao and Gliricidia maculata

by Ling, A.H; Mainstone, B.J.
Publisher: 1983Subject(s): THEOBROMA CACAO | GLIRICIDIA SEPIUM | PLANTAS DE SOMBRA | QUEMA | FERTILIDAD DEL SUELO | DISPONIBILIDAD DE NUTRIENTES | PROPIEDADES FISICOQUIMICAS | MALASIAOnline Resources: En In: Planter (Malasia) v. 59(683) p. 52-59Summary: This paper gives an account of the investigations undertaken to study the effects of burning rubber timber on soil fertility on inland soils (Typic Paleudult) in Peninsular Malaysia. It also discusses the overall influence of the land clearing method on shade and cocoa establishment and subsequent growth. The land clearing method used in replanting has a profound influence on the establishment and growth of cocoa and Gliricidia maculata. Burning of rubber timber resulted in a several fold increase in the supply of available P and the bases K, Ca and Mg to the soils. On the other hand, not only did the unburnt areas not receive additional nutrients from burning but they also suffered from severe soil compaction as a result of mechanical operations during timber stacking. Results indicated a need to re-consider the appropriateness of the current cultural and agronomic practices. It is possible that fertiliser inputs in burnt areas can be reduced during part of the prebearing period of cocoa plantings.
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This paper gives an account of the investigations undertaken to study the effects of burning rubber timber on soil fertility on inland soils (Typic Paleudult) in Peninsular Malaysia. It also discusses the overall influence of the land clearing method on shade and cocoa establishment and subsequent growth. The land clearing method used in replanting has a profound influence on the establishment and growth of cocoa and Gliricidia maculata. Burning of rubber timber resulted in a several fold increase in the supply of available P and the bases K, Ca and Mg to the soils. On the other hand, not only did the unburnt areas not receive additional nutrients from burning but they also suffered from severe soil compaction as a result of mechanical operations during timber stacking. Results indicated a need to re-consider the appropriateness of the current cultural and agronomic practices. It is possible that fertiliser inputs in burnt areas can be reduced during part of the prebearing period of cocoa plantings.

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