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Coconut development in Thailand and its stimulation by cocoa

by Dootson, J; Rattanapruk, M; Suwannawuth, W.
Publisher: Dic 1986Subject(s): THEOBROMA CACAO | INSECTOS DAÑINOS DE LA RAIZ | CULTIVO INTERCALADO | RENDIMIENTO | REHABILITACION DE TIERRAS | TAILANDIA | THEOBROMA CACAO | INTERCROPPING | YIELDS | RECLAMATION | THAILAND | THEOBROMA CACAO | CULTURE INTERCALAIRE | RENDEMENT | RECUPERATION DES SOLS | THAILANDE In: Planter (Malasia) v. 62(729) p. 519-530Summary: Coconut plantations in Thailand are low yielding, often failing to meet national requirements for coconut products. The typical Thai Tall coconut has few, large fruits, shows extreme yield heterogeneity and is not precocious. Lack of soil selection and climatic stress limit yields and cause annual and seasonal fluctuations. It is hoped to increase yields by replanting using precocious, homogeneous and high-yielding hybrid varieties, and through rehabilitation. Cocoa is a recent introduction to Thailand and it is thought that the use of cocoa as a perennial intercrop can be used to stimulate coconut replanting and, in particular, rehabilitation, projects, allowing for crop diversity and increased land unit returns. This is illustrated both in theory and practice. The importance of rigorous varietal selection is indicated. Two strategies for coconut development are required. That for replanting using modern, high input, agricultural techniques, while appropriate, low input technology is better suited to rehabilitation, in anticipation of lower returns
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Coconut plantations in Thailand are low yielding, often failing to meet national requirements for coconut products. The typical Thai Tall coconut has few, large fruits, shows extreme yield heterogeneity and is not precocious. Lack of soil selection and climatic stress limit yields and cause annual and seasonal fluctuations. It is hoped to increase yields by replanting using precocious, homogeneous and high-yielding hybrid varieties, and through rehabilitation. Cocoa is a recent introduction to Thailand and it is thought that the use of cocoa as a perennial intercrop can be used to stimulate coconut replanting and, in particular, rehabilitation, projects, allowing for crop diversity and increased land unit returns. This is illustrated both in theory and practice. The importance of rigorous varietal selection is indicated. Two strategies for coconut development are required. That for replanting using modern, high input, agricultural techniques, while appropriate, low input technology is better suited to rehabilitation, in anticipation of lower returns

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