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Dual purpose shade trees for cocoa Proceedings

by Chalmers, W.S; Cocoa Research Institute, Tafo (Ghana); 3. International Cocoa Research Conference Accra (Ghana) 23-29 Nov 1969.
Publisher: Tafo (Ghana) 1971Description: pv; p. 359-361.Subject(s): THEOBROMA CACAO | PLANTACIONES | REHABILITACION DE TIERRAS | PINUS CARIBAEA | SOMBRA | PLANTAS DE SOMBRA | CULTIVO | TRINIDAD Y TOBAGO | THEOBROMA CACAO | PLANTATIONS | RECLAMATION | PINUS CARIBAEA | SHADE | SHADE PLANTS | CULTIVATION | TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO | THEOBROMA CACAO | PLANTATIONS | RECUPERATION DES SOLS | PINUS CARIBAEA | OMBRE | PLANTE D'OMBRAGE | PRATIQUE CULTURALE | TRINITE-ET-TOBAGO | SISTEMA TAUNGYA | TAUNGYASummary: There are about 100.000 acres of cocoa in Trinidad giving an average yield of about 150 lb of dry cocoa/acre/year. Among the reasons for this low yield are poor soils and inadequate management. The view is put forward that rehabilitation could take the form of clear felling and replanting, making use of the Taungya System and Pinus caribaea as a shade tree. Both cocoa and pine would be grown on a 30-year rotation. On poor quality sites the pine should give yields of about 3.000-4.000 cu ft of timber per acre, the revenue from which would prove a great incentive to clear and replant again with the best available material. The feasibility of such a scheme can only be proved by establishing a number of 1-2 hect. experimental plots in various localities
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There are about 100.000 acres of cocoa in Trinidad giving an average yield of about 150 lb of dry cocoa/acre/year. Among the reasons for this low yield are poor soils and inadequate management. The view is put forward that rehabilitation could take the form of clear felling and replanting, making use of the Taungya System and Pinus caribaea as a shade tree. Both cocoa and pine would be grown on a 30-year rotation. On poor quality sites the pine should give yields of about 3.000-4.000 cu ft of timber per acre, the revenue from which would prove a great incentive to clear and replant again with the best available material. The feasibility of such a scheme can only be proved by establishing a number of 1-2 hect. experimental plots in various localities

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