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Cacao curing in retrospect and prospect Proceedings

by Jones, E; Quesnel, V.C; Chalmers, W.S; Fordham, R; Iton, E.F. eds; Quesnel, V.C; Murray, D.B; Cocoa Research Institute, St. Augustine (Trinidad y Tobago); 4. International Cocoa Research Conference St. Augustine (Trinidad y Tobago) 8-18 Ene 1972.
Publisher: St. Augustine (Trinidad y Tobago) 1972Description: p. 602-606.Subject(s): CACAO | CHOCOLATE | FERMENTACION | AROMA | COTILEDONES | PULPA | ACIDO ACETICO | COMPUESTOS ORGANICOS | SECADO | TEORIA DE KNAPP | CACAO (PLANT) | CHOCOLATE | FERMENTATION | COTYLEDONS | ACETIC ACID | ORGANIC COMPOUNDS | DRYING | CACAOYER | CHOCOLAT | FERMENTATION | COTYLEDON | ACIDE ACETIQUE | COMPOSE ORGANIQUE | SECHAGESummary: Progress in cacao curing is reviewed from 1937 to the present day. The concept of internal fermentation as an oxidative process dependent on heat has given way to one that emphasizes the importance of hydrolytic reactions taking place under anaerobic conditions. The production of acetic acid is the key reaction in the pulp since acetic acid kills the seed, lowers the pH of the cotyledon to the range favourable for hydrolytic reactions, and maintains the pH of the pulp in a range too low for the proliferation of putrefactive bacteria. Furthermore its production and destruction liberate the heat necessary to bring the bean to the optimum temperature. Prospects for the future both at the research level and the technological level are outlined
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Progress in cacao curing is reviewed from 1937 to the present day. The concept of internal fermentation as an oxidative process dependent on heat has given way to one that emphasizes the importance of hydrolytic reactions taking place under anaerobic conditions. The production of acetic acid is the key reaction in the pulp since acetic acid kills the seed, lowers the pH of the cotyledon to the range favourable for hydrolytic reactions, and maintains the pH of the pulp in a range too low for the proliferation of putrefactive bacteria. Furthermore its production and destruction liberate the heat necessary to bring the bean to the optimum temperature. Prospects for the future both at the research level and the technological level are outlined

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