Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Insectes pollinisateurs cacaoyer en fecondation croisee au Cameroun

by Quesnel, V.C; Chalmers, W.S; Fordham, R; Iton, E.F. eds; Bruneau de Miré, P; Mbondji Mbondji, P; Murray, D.B; Jones, E; Cocoa Research Institute, St. Augustine (Trinidad y Tobago); 4. International Cocoa Research Conference St. Augustine (Trinidad y Tobago) 8-18 Ene 1972.
Publisher: St. Augustine (Trinidad y Tobago) 1972Description: p. 566-569.Other Title: Proceedings.Subject(s): THEOBROMA CACAO | POLINIZACION | POLINIZADORES | CERATOPOGONIDAE | DROSOPHILA TRIANGULIFER | CREMATOGASTER | CAMERUN | THEOBROMA CACAO | POLLINATION | POLLINATORS | CERATOPOGONIDAE | CREMATOGASTER | CAMEROON | THEOBROMA CACAO | POLLINISATION | POLLINISATEUR | CERATOPOGONIDAE | CREMATOGASTER | CAMEROUNSummary: A preliminary study of self-incompatible cacao at the Cacao Station at Nkoemvone was not able to show any relation between the frequency of visits to the flowers by Dipterous Ceratopogonids and the setting rate. New observations were extended to a larger range of insects. In 1971, 2600 self-incompatible cacao flowers were watched on the morning following anthesis. The mean setting rate was 12 percent. No live insect was seen on 52.3 percent of the flowers which nevertheless accounted for 9.8 percent of the setting, resulting probably from fertilization occurring outside of the hours of watch. When the presence of insects could be established, this rate reached 16.4 percent, 18.9 percent when Diptera were included. One flower loving species, Drosophila (Scaptodrosophila) triangulifer Lamb sensu Burla seems to have alone been responsible for more than 43 percent of identified fertilizations, followed by Crematogaster and Ceratopogonids, mainly of the Stilobezzia genus. These last were present in less than 23 percent of the fertilizations which might explain that their effect could have been masked by those of other insects
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
No physical items for this record

Sum. (En, Fr)

A preliminary study of self-incompatible cacao at the Cacao Station at Nkoemvone was not able to show any relation between the frequency of visits to the flowers by Dipterous Ceratopogonids and the setting rate. New observations were extended to a larger range of insects. In 1971, 2600 self-incompatible cacao flowers were watched on the morning following anthesis. The mean setting rate was 12 percent. No live insect was seen on 52.3 percent of the flowers which nevertheless accounted for 9.8 percent of the setting, resulting probably from fertilization occurring outside of the hours of watch. When the presence of insects could be established, this rate reached 16.4 percent, 18.9 percent when Diptera were included. One flower loving species, Drosophila (Scaptodrosophila) triangulifer Lamb sensu Burla seems to have alone been responsible for more than 43 percent of identified fertilizations, followed by Crematogaster and Ceratopogonids, mainly of the Stilobezzia genus. These last were present in less than 23 percent of the fertilizations which might explain that their effect could have been masked by those of other insects

Click on an image to view it in the image viewer