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Cacao breeding in Nigeria during the 1960-69 decade Proceedings

by Jones, E; Quesnel, V.C; Chalmers, W.S; Fordham, R; Iton, E.F. eds; Opeke, L.K; Murray, D.B; Cocoa Research Institute, St. Augustine (Trinidad y Tobago); 4. International Cocoa Research Conference St. Augustine (Trinidad y Tobago) 8-18 Ene 1972.
Publisher: St. Augustine (Trinidad y Tobago) 1972Description: p. 25-31.Subject(s): THEOBROMA CACAO | PROGRAMAS DE MEJORAMIENTO | SELECCION | PROGENIE | VARIEDADES DE RENDIMIENTO ELEVADO | RESISTENCIA A LA ENFERMEDAD | ENFERMEDADES FUNGOSAS | CLONES AMELONADOS | CLONES AMAZONAS | CLONES ELITE | PHYTOPHTHORA PALMIVORA | NIGERIA | THEOBROMA CACAO | SELECTION | PROGENY | DISEASE RESISTANCE | FUNGAL DISEASES | PHYTOPHTHORA PALMIVORA | NIGERIA | THEOBROMA CACAO | SELECTION | DESCENDANCE | RESISTANCE AUX MALADIES | MALADIE FONGIQUE | PHYTOPHTHORA PALMIVORA | NIGERIASummary: Theobroma cacao (L.), was introduced into Nigeria through Bonny in the Rivers State from Fernando Po by Chief Squiss Ibaningo in 1874. Commercial cultivation of the crop, especially in the Western State of Nigeria, (the state that currently produces approximately 90 per cent of Nigerian cacao), started in the 1890's. The first Nigerian cacao breeding programme concentrated on selection and progeny testing of local material. The popular T38 (N38) an Amelonado selection resulted from this programme. With the establishment of the West African Cacao Research Institute (W.A.C.R.I.) in 1944, the Institute embarked on an intensive introduction and breeding programme. The breeding efforts of WACRI produced some widely grown varieties including the F3 Amazons. On the dissolution of WACRI, Nigerian Substation of WACRI which was legally constituted as the Cocoa Research Institute of Nigeria (CRIN) initiated the second Nigerian Cacao Breeding Programme. The major objective was to produce superior genotypes with good establishment ability, high level of disease tolerance/resistance/escape, high yield and other desirable commercial qualities. As a result of this programme, fifteen CRIN Establishment Elite varieties were produced. Alongside the Elite breeding programme, other projects such as the inbreeding of selected clones, diallel crossing of WACRI "C" clones and germplasm collection and especially the Nigerian-Trinidad Introduction Programme were undertaken. The results of these various programmes are discussed in relation to cacao production in Nigeria
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Theobroma cacao (L.), was introduced into Nigeria through Bonny in the Rivers State from Fernando Po by Chief Squiss Ibaningo in 1874. Commercial cultivation of the crop, especially in the Western State of Nigeria, (the state that currently produces approximately 90 per cent of Nigerian cacao), started in the 1890's. The first Nigerian cacao breeding programme concentrated on selection and progeny testing of local material. The popular T38 (N38) an Amelonado selection resulted from this programme. With the establishment of the West African Cacao Research Institute (W.A.C.R.I.) in 1944, the Institute embarked on an intensive introduction and breeding programme. The breeding efforts of WACRI produced some widely grown varieties including the F3 Amazons. On the dissolution of WACRI, Nigerian Substation of WACRI which was legally constituted as the Cocoa Research Institute of Nigeria (CRIN) initiated the second Nigerian Cacao Breeding Programme. The major objective was to produce superior genotypes with good establishment ability, high level of disease tolerance/resistance/escape, high yield and other desirable commercial qualities. As a result of this programme, fifteen CRIN Establishment Elite varieties were produced. Alongside the Elite breeding programme, other projects such as the inbreeding of selected clones, diallel crossing of WACRI "C" clones and germplasm collection and especially the Nigerian-Trinidad Introduction Programme were undertaken. The results of these various programmes are discussed in relation to cacao production in Nigeria

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