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Secondary forest dynamics in the upland plateau at Belterra, Santarem, Para Management and rehabilitation of degraded lands and secondary forests in Amazonia. Proceedings

by Oliveira, L.C. de; Silva, J.N.M; Parrotta, J.A; Kanashiro, M. eds; Department of Agriculture, Río Piedras, Puerto Rico (EUA). Forest Service; International Symposium/Workshop on the Management and Rehabilitation of Degraded Lands and Secondary Forests in Amazonia Santarém, PA (Brasil) 18-22 Abr 1993.
Publisher: Río Piedras, Puerto Rico (EUA) 1995Description: p. 129-141.Subject(s): DINAMICA DE LA POBLACION | COMPOSICION BOTANICA | CRECIMIENTO | MORTALIDAD | VOLUMEN | BOSQUE SECUNDARIO | BRASIL | BOTANICAL COMPOSITION | GROWTH | MORTALITY | VOLUME | SECONDARY FORESTS | BRAZIL | COMPOSITION BOTANIQUE | CROISSANCE | MORTALITE | VOLUME | FORET SECONDAIRE | BRESILSummary: The management of secondary forest for timber production is an alternative use of land, which is becoming important in both the Brazilian and the international contexts, as the number of abandoned areas increases due to the intensive and uncontrolled logging, as well as the shifting agriculture and extensive pasture. In Brazilian Amazonia, it is estimated that 400,000 ha are left as fallow annually due to the shifting cultivation. A process of natural regeneration occurs in those areas, ending with the establishment of a new forest, which is usually dominated by light-demanding fast growing species. The present study deals with the dynamics and growth of tree species in a 56 ha secondary forest, which grew up in an approximately 50 year old rubber plantation left without silvicultural treatments, in Belterra, municipality of Santarém, State of Pará.
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The management of secondary forest for timber production is an alternative use of land, which is becoming important in both the Brazilian and the international contexts, as the number of abandoned areas increases due to the intensive and uncontrolled logging, as well as the shifting agriculture and extensive pasture. In Brazilian Amazonia, it is estimated that 400,000 ha are left as fallow annually due to the shifting cultivation. A process of natural regeneration occurs in those areas, ending with the establishment of a new forest, which is usually dominated by light-demanding fast growing species. The present study deals with the dynamics and growth of tree species in a 56 ha secondary forest, which grew up in an approximately 50 year old rubber plantation left without silvicultural treatments, in Belterra, municipality of Santarém, State of Pará.

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