Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Efectos del régimen de luz sobre la fotosíntesis y el crecimiento en plántulas de árboles de un bosque lluvioso tropical de Costa Rica

by Fetcher, N; Oberbauer, S.F; Rojas, G; Strain, B.R.
Publisher: 1987ISSN: 0034-7744.Subject(s): REGIMENES DE LUZ | FOTOSINTESIS | CRECIMIENTO | BOSQUE TROPICAL HUMEDO | COSTA RICA | LIGHT REGIMES | PHOTOSYNTHESIS | GROWTH | TROPICAL RAIN FORESTS | COSTA RICA | REGIME LUMINEUX | PHOTOSYNTHESE | CROISSANCE | FORET TROPICALE HUMIDE | COSTA RICA In: Revista de Biología Tropical (Costa Rica) v. 35 (Supl. 1) p. 111-118Summary: Terrestrial herbs of the forest understory do not show the dramatic latitudinal decrease in species richness found in other groups of plants. Experimental and descriptive studies of tropical forest understory herbs were initiated on and near Barro Colorado island, Panama, in order to better understand what factors may control local patterns of abundance and distribution. Preliminary data suggest that local variation in herb species richness is correlated with patterns of treefalls and with patterns of seasonal drought. Most herb species show rapid growth and reproduction only in or near treefall gaps, and generally undergo prolonged periods of suppression beneath closed canopy forest. A few species which do not persist in the shade as suppressed adults appear to persist as seeds in the soil. However, most species do not persist in the seed bank, so that most "colonization" of new treefall gaps takes the form of accelerated growth of previously suppressed individuals. Such plants may live longer than the trees that shade them.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
No physical items for this record

6 ilus. 2 tab. 27 ref. Sum. (En)

Terrestrial herbs of the forest understory do not show the dramatic latitudinal decrease in species richness found in other groups of plants. Experimental and descriptive studies of tropical forest understory herbs were initiated on and near Barro Colorado island, Panama, in order to better understand what factors may control local patterns of abundance and distribution. Preliminary data suggest that local variation in herb species richness is correlated with patterns of treefalls and with patterns of seasonal drought. Most herb species show rapid growth and reproduction only in or near treefall gaps, and generally undergo prolonged periods of suppression beneath closed canopy forest. A few species which do not persist in the shade as suppressed adults appear to persist as seeds in the soil. However, most species do not persist in the seed bank, so that most "colonization" of new treefall gaps takes the form of accelerated growth of previously suppressed individuals. Such plants may live longer than the trees that shade them.

Click on an image to view it in the image viewer