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Forest management for forest production by indigenous communities Wise management of tropical forests. Proceedings

by Adam, K.L. eds; Shepherd, G; Miller, F.R; Oxford Conference on Tropical Forests Oxford (RU) 30 Mar - 1 Abr 1992.
Publisher: Oxford (Ru) 1992Description: p. 111-124.ISBN: 0850741254.Subject(s): MANEJO FORESTAL | POBLACION INDIGENA | POLITICA FORESTAL | FORESTRY POLICIES | POLITIQUE FORESTIERESummary: New knowledge becoming available about indigenous forest management practices, which consist not only of the protection of a specific forested area against use by outsiders without permission; but also of rules for sustainable use by insiders which reveal considerable variety and ingenuity. It is clear that where fallowing systems operate, the division between "forest" and "farmland" is often an artificial one and management may be practised essentially by individuals. In other situations, however, complex communal management may be taking place. We also have some knowledge about the ways in which management changes as populations densities rise, or as the authority of local leaders dwindles and the State grows more powerful. Solutions which have shown some promise all involve the strengthening of tenure. In some cases group ownership has been recreated by the recognition of "customary" tenure by the state; in a few cases, group ownership has been created from scratch; and in still others individual tenurial of leasehold rights have proved to be the more useful way forward. While there are no simple solutions, the possibilities are rich and have as yet scarcely been explored.
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Bib. p. 121-122. Sum. (En)

New knowledge becoming available about indigenous forest management practices, which consist not only of the protection of a specific forested area against use by outsiders without permission; but also of rules for sustainable use by insiders which reveal considerable variety and ingenuity. It is clear that where fallowing systems operate, the division between "forest" and "farmland" is often an artificial one and management may be practised essentially by individuals. In other situations, however, complex communal management may be taking place. We also have some knowledge about the ways in which management changes as populations densities rise, or as the authority of local leaders dwindles and the State grows more powerful. Solutions which have shown some promise all involve the strengthening of tenure. In some cases group ownership has been recreated by the recognition of "customary" tenure by the state; in a few cases, group ownership has been created from scratch; and in still others individual tenurial of leasehold rights have proved to be the more useful way forward. While there are no simple solutions, the possibilities are rich and have as yet scarcely been explored.

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