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Interaction between forest management for forest production and forest regeneration Wise management of tropical forests. Proceedings

by Adam, K.L. eds; Brown, N.D; Miller, F.R; Oxford Conference on Tropical Forests Oxford (RU) 30 Mar - 1 Abr 1992.
Publisher: Oxford (RU) 1992Description: p. 11-17.ISBN: 0850741254.Subject(s): MANEJO FORESTAL | REGENERACION NATURAL | CLAROS | PRODUCCION FORESTAL | BOSQUE TROPICAL HUMEDO | NATURAL REGENERATION | FORESTRY PRODUCTION | TROPICAL RAIN FORESTS | REGENERATION NATURELLE | PRODUCTION FORESTIERE | FORET TROPICALE HUMIDESummary: Most tropical rain forest trees are dependent on disturbance of the dense forest canopy to create conditions necessary for their regeneration. Disturbance is both intrinsic and essential to the forest growth cycle. However, the speed and composition of the regeneration is contingent on the scale, timing and frequency of disturbance. Tropical rain forest trees can be divided crudely into two ecological classes, pioneer and climax species. Differences in the carbon, mineral nutrient and water relations of climax species result in changes in their relative competitive status as the nature of forest disturbance changes. Pioneer species exploit highly disturbed areas. This creates a disturbance threshold beyond which forest regeneration may be delayed or deflected. Excessive forest disturbance may also result in critical changes in phenological patterns, seed availability, and plant-animal interactions with detrimental consequences for regeneration.
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Most tropical rain forest trees are dependent on disturbance of the dense forest canopy to create conditions necessary for their regeneration. Disturbance is both intrinsic and essential to the forest growth cycle. However, the speed and composition of the regeneration is contingent on the scale, timing and frequency of disturbance. Tropical rain forest trees can be divided crudely into two ecological classes, pioneer and climax species. Differences in the carbon, mineral nutrient and water relations of climax species result in changes in their relative competitive status as the nature of forest disturbance changes. Pioneer species exploit highly disturbed areas. This creates a disturbance threshold beyond which forest regeneration may be delayed or deflected. Excessive forest disturbance may also result in critical changes in phenological patterns, seed availability, and plant-animal interactions with detrimental consequences for regeneration.

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