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River dynamics and natural forest regeneration in the Peruvian Amazon Rain forest regeneration and management

by Hadley, M. eds; Salo, J.S; Kalliola, R.J; Gómez Pompa, A; Whitmore, T.C; UNESCO, París (Francia). Man and the Biosphere Programme.
Series: Man and the Biosphere Series (Francia).Publisher: París (Francia) Parthenon 1991Description: p. 245-256.Subject(s): REGENERACION NATURAL | CURSOS DE AGUA | TIERRAS INUNDADAS | DINAMICA DE LA POBLACION | SUCESION ECOLOGICA | AMAZONIA | PERU | NATURAL REGENERATION | RIVERS | FLOODED LAND | ECOLOGICAL SUCCESSION | AMAZONIA | PERU | REGENERATION NATURELLE | COURS D'EAU | TERRE INONDEE | SUCCESSION ECOLOGIQUE | AMAZONIE | PEROU In: Summary: Flat topography, high loads of suspended solids and easily erodable alluvial substrates are three factors underlying the important role of river dynamics in land transformation, forest regeneration and species diversity in Western Amazonia. Satellite analyses show that 26.6 per cent of the modern lowland forest has characteristics of recent erosional and depositional activity, and that 12.0 per cent of the Peruvian lowland forest is in successional stages along rivers. These findings contrast with some traditional views of Amazonian rain forest, which have tended to emphasize stability, with the dominant mode of forest regeneration occurring in light gaps created by fallen trees. The factors causing fluvial perturbance are discussed, the forests of various floodplain generations (contemporary and past) described, and the role of river dynamics in rain forest regeneration examined.
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Ilus. Tab. 22 ref. Sum. (En)

Flat topography, high loads of suspended solids and easily erodable alluvial substrates are three factors underlying the important role of river dynamics in land transformation, forest regeneration and species diversity in Western Amazonia. Satellite analyses show that 26.6 per cent of the modern lowland forest has characteristics of recent erosional and depositional activity, and that 12.0 per cent of the Peruvian lowland forest is in successional stages along rivers. These findings contrast with some traditional views of Amazonian rain forest, which have tended to emphasize stability, with the dominant mode of forest regeneration occurring in light gaps created by fallen trees. The factors causing fluvial perturbance are discussed, the forests of various floodplain generations (contemporary and past) described, and the role of river dynamics in rain forest regeneration examined.

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