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Mortality patterns and stand turnover rates in a wet tropical forest in Costa Rica

by Lieberman, D; Lieberman, M; Peralta, R; Hartshorn, G.S.
Publisher: 1985ISSN: 0022-0477.Subject(s): MORTALIDAD | DISTRIBUCION DE LA POBLACION | BOSQUE NATURAL | DINAMICA DE LA POBLACION | BOSQUE TROPICAL HUMEDO | COSTA RICA | MORTALITY | POPULATION DISTRIBUTION | TROPICAL RAIN FORESTS | COSTA RICA | MORTALITE | DISTRIBUTION DES POPULATIONS | FORET TROPICALE HUMIDE | COSTA RICA In: Journal of Ecology (RU) v. 73(3) p. 915-924Summary: (1) Mortality over a 13-year period was determined for all stems (ó10-cm dbh) on 12.4 ha of primary lowland wet tropical forest at La Selva, Costa Rica. Altogether 23.2 percent of 5623 trees and lianas present in the initial inventory had died by the time of the subsequent inventory. (2) Mortality rates were independent of size among individuals ó10-cm dbh, and did not differ between buttressed and non-buttressed stems. (3) Of the dead individuals. 26 percent died standing, 31 percent had fallen, 7 percent were found buried under treefalls, and 37 percent had decomposed entirely, leaving no trace. (4) Mortality was nearly balanced by recruitment into the 10-cm dbh class: there was a net loss of 1.7 percent of stems in 13 years. (5) La Selva appears to be among the most dynamic of tropical forests studied to date, with an annual loss of stems of 2.03 percent and a consequent stand half-life of 34 years.
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Ilus. Tab. 21 ref. Sum. (En)

(1) Mortality over a 13-year period was determined for all stems (ó10-cm dbh) on 12.4 ha of primary lowland wet tropical forest at La Selva, Costa Rica. Altogether 23.2 percent of 5623 trees and lianas present in the initial inventory had died by the time of the subsequent inventory. (2) Mortality rates were independent of size among individuals ó10-cm dbh, and did not differ between buttressed and non-buttressed stems. (3) Of the dead individuals. 26 percent died standing, 31 percent had fallen, 7 percent were found buried under treefalls, and 37 percent had decomposed entirely, leaving no trace. (4) Mortality was nearly balanced by recruitment into the 10-cm dbh class: there was a net loss of 1.7 percent of stems in 13 years. (5) La Selva appears to be among the most dynamic of tropical forests studied to date, with an annual loss of stems of 2.03 percent and a consequent stand half-life of 34 years.

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