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Natural regeneration in a secondary Colombian rain forest; its implications for natural forest management in the tropics

by Ladrach, W.E; Wright, J.A.
Publisher: 1995Subject(s): REGENERACION NATURAL | APROVECHAMIENTO FORESTAL | MANEJO FORESTAL | BOSQUE SECUNDARIO | COLOMBIA | NATURAL REGENERATION | SECONDARY FORESTS | COLOMBIA | REGENERATION NATURELLE | FORET SECONDAIRE | COLOMBIE In: Journal of Sustainable Forestry (EUA) v. 3(1) p. 15-38Summary: The Bajo Calima Forest Concession on the Pacific Coast of Colombia is an example of a natural forest management system designed to provide for sustained wood production of a rain forest while maintaining existing biological diversity. Started in 1959 as a cooperative initiative between government and industry, the concession supplies wood to the world's first mill to successfully use mixed tropical hardwoods to make kraft pulp and paper products. Wood is harvested by clear-cutting and forwarded to the road by skylene cable. Forest research has confirmed that a 30-year rotation is biologically feasible for sustained timber yields, but that undisturbed forest reserves are essential for maintaining species diversity. A major obstacle to successful implementation of the management plan is the lack of an effective control of unauthorized and uncontrolled cutting by third parties in the natural regeneration as well as in the primary forest within the concession
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43 ref. Sum. (En)

The Bajo Calima Forest Concession on the Pacific Coast of Colombia is an example of a natural forest management system designed to provide for sustained wood production of a rain forest while maintaining existing biological diversity. Started in 1959 as a cooperative initiative between government and industry, the concession supplies wood to the world's first mill to successfully use mixed tropical hardwoods to make kraft pulp and paper products. Wood is harvested by clear-cutting and forwarded to the road by skylene cable. Forest research has confirmed that a 30-year rotation is biologically feasible for sustained timber yields, but that undisturbed forest reserves are essential for maintaining species diversity. A major obstacle to successful implementation of the management plan is the lack of an effective control of unauthorized and uncontrolled cutting by third parties in the natural regeneration as well as in the primary forest within the concession

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