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Farmers' attitudes towards trees Advances in agroforestry. Proceedings

by Fassbender, H.W; Heuveldop, J. eds; Marmillod, A; Beer, J; CATIE, Turrialba (Costa Rica); GTZ, Eschborn (Alemania); Advances in Agroforestry Research Turrialba (Costa Rica) 1-11 Sep 1985.
Series: Serie Técnica. Informe Técnico.Publisher: Turrialba (Costa Rica), 1987 Description: p. 259-270.Subject(s): SOCIOLOGIA | USO DE LA TIERRA | PLANES, PROGRAMAS Y PROYECTOS | LEÑA | MADERA | ARBOLES DE SOMBRA | CERCAS VIVAS | DEFORESTACION | CATIE | COSTA RICA | SOCIOLOGY | WOOD | SHADE TREES | DEFORESTATION | COSTA RICA | SOCIOLOGIE | BOIS | ARBRE D'OMBRAGE | DEBOISEMENT | COSTA RICA In: Summary: A survey was made of the farmer's perception of an agroforestry development project, and the problems the project sought to alleviate, in the mountainous areas of Acosta and Puriscal, Costa Rica. In sub-areas which were more developed, and which had higher population density, the following changes were noted: less diversity in land-use; lower incidence of trees with crops and pastures; greater preocupation about future fuelwood supplies. Although many farmers approve of laws controlling tree felling, there was a mixed reaction due to the bureaucratic problems which affect the granting of permits. Most of the trees are naturally regenerated, particularly those used for coffee shade and fuelwood, as well as most timber trees. The main motivation for planting trees is for fruit production, followed by timber production. There was no evidence that the farmers believed in a link between deforestation and the small landslides which are common in both areas. It was concluded that the farmerswill be receptive to tree planting programmes provided that their interests are met. In these areas the priorities for an agroforestry programme (tree component) should be: 1) fruit trees; 2) fuelwood trees; 3) fast growing trees that produce poles; 4) timber trees for saw logs. Emphasis should be given to the possibilities of establishing these trees in underutilized fence lines
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A survey was made of the farmer's perception of an agroforestry development project, and the problems the project sought to alleviate, in the mountainous areas of Acosta and Puriscal, Costa Rica. In sub-areas which were more developed, and which had higher population density, the following changes were noted: less diversity in land-use; lower incidence of trees with crops and pastures; greater preocupation about future fuelwood supplies. Although many farmers approve of laws controlling tree felling, there was a mixed reaction due to the bureaucratic problems which affect the granting of permits. Most of the trees are naturally regenerated, particularly those used for coffee shade and fuelwood, as well as most timber trees. The main motivation for planting trees is for fruit production, followed by timber production. There was no evidence that the farmers believed in a link between deforestation and the small landslides which are common in both areas. It was concluded that the farmerswill be receptive to tree planting programmes provided that their interests are met. In these areas the priorities for an agroforestry programme (tree component) should be: 1) fruit trees; 2) fuelwood trees; 3) fast growing trees that produce poles; 4) timber trees for saw logs. Emphasis should be given to the possibilities of establishing these trees in underutilized fence lines

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