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Experiences with fence line fodder trees in Costa Rica and Nicaragua Proceedings

by Fassbender, H.W; Heuveldop, J. eds; Beer, J.W; Beer, J.W; CATIE, Turrialba (Costa Rica); GTZ, Eschborn (Alemania); Advances in Agroforestry Research Turrialba (Costa Rica) 1-11 Sep 1985.
Series: Serie Técnica. Informe Técnico (CATIE).Publisher: Turrialba, (Costa Rica) 1987Description: p. 215-222.Subject(s): ERYTHRINA | ERYTHRINA BERTEROANA | GLIRICIDIA SEPIUM | CERCAS VIVAS | ALIMENTOS PARA ANIMALES | PROPAGACION VEGETATIVA | BIOMASA | PODA | SPONDIAS | COSTA RICA | NICARAGUA | ERYTHRINA | GLIRICIDIA SEPIUM | ANIMAL FEEDING STUFFS | VEGETATIVE PROPAGATION | BIOMASS | PRUNING | SPONDIAS | COSTA RICA | NICARAGUA | ERYTHRINA | GLIRICIDIA SEPIUM | MULTIPLICATION VEGETATIVE | BIOMASSE | TAILLE | SPONDIAS | COSTA RICA | NICARAGUA In: Summary: The management of traditional living fence post species is discussed with emphasis on their potential as a dry season fodder reserve. a list is given of the factors to consider when designing a study on the vegetative propagation of these species. Early survival of Gliricidia sepium and Spondias purpurea, in experimental plantations situated in the seasonally dry areas of Puriscal, Costa Rica and Jinotega, Nicaragua, is better than that of various Erythrina spp. However, assessments at 3-4 month intervals showed that survival should not be determined less than one year after planting. In an experimental planting of E. berteroana in the more humid area of Turrialba, Costa Rica, no mortality occured. Half of these one year old living fence posts were pruned in November and March, while the rest were only pruned in March. The non-traditional November pruning provoked shoot growth and halted deciduousness during the dry season, and provided 300 percent more forage in March.
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The management of traditional living fence post species is discussed with emphasis on their potential as a dry season fodder reserve. a list is given of the factors to consider when designing a study on the vegetative propagation of these species. Early survival of Gliricidia sepium and Spondias purpurea, in experimental plantations situated in the seasonally dry areas of Puriscal, Costa Rica and Jinotega, Nicaragua, is better than that of various Erythrina spp. However, assessments at 3-4 month intervals showed that survival should not be determined less than one year after planting. In an experimental planting of E. berteroana in the more humid area of Turrialba, Costa Rica, no mortality occured. Half of these one year old living fence posts were pruned in November and March, while the rest were only pruned in March. The non-traditional November pruning provoked shoot growth and halted deciduousness during the dry season, and provided 300 percent more forage in March.

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