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British forestry mission, Nicaragua: species and provenance trials 1972-1977

by Evans, H.B.L. (comp.); Ministry of Overseas Development, Londres (Ru).
Publisher: Londres (RU) sfDescription: 45p.Subject(s): ORDENACION FORESTAL | UTILIZACION DE LA TIERRA | PROYECTOS DE DESARROLLO | POLITICAS | NICARAGUA | FOREST MANAGEMENT | LAND USE | DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS | POLICIES | NICARAGUA | AMENAGEMENT FORESTIER | UTILISATION DES TERRES | PROJET DE DEVELOPPEMENT | POLITIQUE | NICARAGUASummary: 134 forest species and provenance have been tested in a series of country wide elimination trials from 1972 - 1976 to determine which of these have potential commercial use, particularly in the more populated Pacific and central regions of Nicaragua. The Petford provenance of Eucalyptus camaldulensis has so far demonstrated the most promising growth in the Pacific zone - maximum top height 12 metres at 24 months after planting - and trials are continuing to determine its suitability for wind-breaks in the 60,000 ha. cotton growing area centred around Leon and Chinandega where soil erosion by wind has reached alarming levels. It is recommended that future work be concerned with promoting Eucalypt planting for wind-breaks and agri-silviculture generally in the Pacific and central regions, and with simple and inexpensive methods of Eucalypt fence post treatment. Potential application for promising wet zone species such as Gmelina arborea, Teak, and several Eucalypts, also exists in the Government-sponsored "Rigoberto Cabezas" settlement scheme in the Atlantic coastal region
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134 forest species and provenance have been tested in a series of country wide elimination trials from 1972 - 1976 to determine which of these have potential commercial use, particularly in the more populated Pacific and central regions of Nicaragua. The Petford provenance of Eucalyptus camaldulensis has so far demonstrated the most promising growth in the Pacific zone - maximum top height 12 metres at 24 months after planting - and trials are continuing to determine its suitability for wind-breaks in the 60,000 ha. cotton growing area centred around Leon and Chinandega where soil erosion by wind has reached alarming levels. It is recommended that future work be concerned with promoting Eucalypt planting for wind-breaks and agri-silviculture generally in the Pacific and central regions, and with simple and inexpensive methods of Eucalypt fence post treatment. Potential application for promising wet zone species such as Gmelina arborea, Teak, and several Eucalypts, also exists in the Government-sponsored "Rigoberto Cabezas" settlement scheme in the Atlantic coastal region

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