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Use of fast-growing nitrogen-fixing trees as living support for tropical yams (Dioscorea alata L.)

by Jiménez B, J.M; Víquez, L.E; Kass, D.C.L; Chavarría S, M.R; CATIE, Turrialba (Costa Rica); 3. International Windbreaks & Agroforestry Symposium Ridgetown, Ont. (Canadá) Jun 1991.
Publisher: Turrialba (Costa Rica) [s.f.]Description: 10 p.Subject(s): SOPORTES VIVOS | FIJACION DE NITROGENO | CULTIVOS ANUALES | ERYTHRINA BERTEROANA | GLIRICIDIA SEPIUM | DIOSCOREA ALATA | COSTA RICA | GLIRICIDIA SEPIUM | DIOSCOREA ALATA | COSTA RICA | GLIRICIDIA SEPIUM | DIOSCOREA ALATA | COSTA RICASummary: Tropical yams of the genus Dioscorea require support systems for erect growth and high yields. Traditional staking methods using posts and wires have become very expensive in developing countries, even, as in Costa Rica, where the yams are frequently exported to supply West Indian populations in North America rather than consumed locally. Nitrogen fixing trees of the species GLIRICIDIA SEPIUM (Jacq.) Walp. and ERYTHRINA BETEROANA were thought to be suitable for a low cost yam stake as trees could be periodically pruned to avoid excessive foliage production interferring with yam development. Two pruning frequencies of each tree species were compared with yams grown without support, yams grown with wooden stakes, and yams supported by wires in a field experiment with four replications. The soil at the site on the CATIE (Tropical Agriculture Research and Training Center) experimental farm in Turrialba, Costa Rica (9° 53'N, 83° 34'W, 602 meters above sea level) is classified as a Typic Humitropept, fine, halloysitic, isohyperthermic. Economic analysis of the results should indicate whether fast-growing nitrogen fixing trees offer a viable alternative to the artificial supports.
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Tropical yams of the genus Dioscorea require support systems for erect growth and high yields. Traditional staking methods using posts and wires have become very expensive in developing countries, even, as in Costa Rica, where the yams are frequently exported to supply West Indian populations in North America rather than consumed locally. Nitrogen fixing trees of the species GLIRICIDIA SEPIUM (Jacq.) Walp. and ERYTHRINA BETEROANA were thought to be suitable for a low cost yam stake as trees could be periodically pruned to avoid excessive foliage production interferring with yam development. Two pruning frequencies of each tree species were compared with yams grown without support, yams grown with wooden stakes, and yams supported by wires in a field experiment with four replications. The soil at the site on the CATIE (Tropical Agriculture Research and Training Center) experimental farm in Turrialba, Costa Rica (9° 53'N, 83° 34'W, 602 meters above sea level) is classified as a Typic Humitropept, fine, halloysitic, isohyperthermic. Economic analysis of the results should indicate whether fast-growing nitrogen fixing trees offer a viable alternative to the artificial supports.

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