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La influencia de árboles leguminosos y no leguminosos sobre el forraje que crece bajo ellos

by Dacarett D, M; Blydenstein, J.
Publisher: 1968Subject(s): SUELOS | ALIMENTOS PARA ANIMALES | ARBOLES DE SOMBRA | SIMBIOSIS | ERYTHRINA | GLIRICIDIA SEPIUM | CORDIA | PITHECELLOBIUM | ANIMAL FEEDING STUFFS | SHADE TREES | SYMBIOSIS | ERYTHRINA | GLIRICIDIA SEPIUM | CORDIA | PITHECELLOBIUM | ARBRE D'OMBRAGE | SYMBIOSE | ERYTHRINA | GLIRICIDIA SEPIUM | CORDIA | PITHECELLOBIUM In: Turrialba (IICA) v.18(4) p. 405-408Summary: The development and chemical composition of herbaceous vegetation growing in the shade of trees and on unshadded plots, was studied. Three leguminous tree species, Poró Gigante (Erythrina poeppigiana), Samán (Pithecellobium saman) and Madero Negro (Gliricidia sepium), and one Boraginaceae timber species, Laurel (Cordia alliodora), were used. The study area was located in a pasture of the Animal Husbandry Department of IICA at Turrialba, Costa Rica. All trees were around seven years old. None of the tree species reduced dry matter production significantly, in comparison with the unshaded control plot. Percentage of fiber was significantly higher on the control plot, compared to any of the tree species. Protein percentage of the herbage under Poró Gigante was significantly higher herbage under any other species. The herbage under Laurel and on the control plot was significantly lower in protein content, with the other two leguminous tree species giving intermediate results. Soil nitrogen content was slightly higher in the upper layers under the leguminous trees. Only roots of Poró Gigante and Madero Negro were encountered close to the soil surface in the root zone the herbaceous vegetation. The roots of Poró Gigante were highly nodulated, while the other leguminous species showed less nodule development.
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The development and chemical composition of herbaceous vegetation growing in the shade of trees and on unshadded plots, was studied. Three leguminous tree species, Poró Gigante (Erythrina poeppigiana), Samán (Pithecellobium saman) and Madero Negro (Gliricidia sepium), and one Boraginaceae timber species, Laurel (Cordia alliodora), were used. The study area was located in a pasture of the Animal Husbandry Department of IICA at Turrialba, Costa Rica. All trees were around seven years old. None of the tree species reduced dry matter production significantly, in comparison with the unshaded control plot. Percentage of fiber was significantly higher on the control plot, compared to any of the tree species. Protein percentage of the herbage under Poró Gigante was significantly higher herbage under any other species. The herbage under Laurel and on the control plot was significantly lower in protein content, with the other two leguminous tree species giving intermediate results. Soil nitrogen content was slightly higher in the upper layers under the leguminous trees. Only roots of Poró Gigante and Madero Negro were encountered close to the soil surface in the root zone the herbaceous vegetation. The roots of Poró Gigante were highly nodulated, while the other leguminous species showed less nodule development.

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